MY PERSONAL PROFILE

RECRUITMENT

attracting, screening, selecting, and onboarding

VIRTUAL TEAMS

implementation and management of virtual teams,virtual work or community-based work

TRAINING

Course development, Online and offline programs, webinars, one-one-one coaching

COMMUNITY BUILDING

Consistent,Persistent,Engaging. Community architect and manager for closed or open online communities.

DIGITAL TOOLS & TECHNOLOGIES

Genie in Websites, Mobisites, Google Apps,Social Media, SEO, SEM

HELLO, I AM UTE GASS


THANK YOU FOR VISITING MY WEBSITE.CONTACT ME IF YOU NEED MY SKILLS!

Ute Gass was born in the heart of the Cape Winelands, Western Cape (South Africa) and currently lives in Berlin,Germany.She is visionary, creative, with proven success, and has held leadership positions in recruitment and skills development industry.She is an internet guru and passionate about leveraging online technologies and tools for business success.She is a citizen of both Germany and South Africa and is fluent (both written and spoken) in English,German,Afrikaans. Find me on LinkedIN

  • EDUCATION

    WHAT I HAVE LEARNED

    I consider myself a lifelong learner and am constantly learning, mostly about new technologies and business efficiencies.I hold Diploma’s in Marketing and Human Resources and various Certificates relating to HR and Web technologies….
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  • EXPERIENCE

    WHERE I HAVE WORKED

    Facebook Marketing Expert
    Convergys/Concentrix
    July 2018 – present
    Optimising Facebook Ad campaigns for Companies and small business. Messenger Marketing and chatbot services.

    Owner/Manager of Wordpress Genie Digital Services
    Previously Ute GassHR – Recuitment/RemoteWorkers/ Training…

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  • SKILLS

    WHAT I AM GOOD AT

    Online marketing, Facebook Ad Campaigns and Improving RETURN ON AD SPEND.
    End-to-end recruitment of permanent, temporary and remote staff
    Research and implementation of sourcing strategies.
    Developing and managing candidate pipelines.
    Leveraging technology tools.
    Dynamic communicator, learning program developer, public speaker and facilitator with captivating presentation skills…
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  • INTERESTS

    WHAT FASCINATES ME.

    I like to understand how things work.I like to spot trends and formulate opportunities in the now.Other than technology and business,I am interested in sustainability,food gardens and job creation.
    – Being in nature energizes me.- GOLF! …sometimes I love it, sometimes I curse it :-)…
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Skills //Talent Acquisition, Recruitment,Training, Managing Virtual Workers,Employer Branding,Community Architect and Manager for closed or open online communities,Websites,Mobisites,Social Media Platforms,SEO,SEM

About this Blog // Latest News // Aggregated content relevant to HR trends

  • THE TOP 3 TRAITS OF NEXT-GEN TALENT ACQUISITION LEADERS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, leadership, recruiting, Strategic Planning, strategy, talent acquisition

    What are businesses demanding of next-generation talent acquisition leaders? 

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  • THE ROLE OF CHATBOTS WHEN HIRING MANY PEOPLE — OR NONE 

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: candidate experience, chatbots, economy, Featured, layoffs, technology

    COVID-19 has changed the landscape for employers worldwide. Over the coming months, companies in highly impacted industries will continue to find themselves either laying off or furloughing employees. 

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  • TALENT ACQUISITION SHIFTS FROM BRINGING PEOPLE IN TO HELPING PEOPLE OUT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advertising & Marketing, Airbnb, Employee Branding, Featured, Job Postings, layoffs, Placements, talent acquisition, Uber, unemployment

    Once upon a time, when companies laid off workers, their severance packages — if they got any at all — included outplacement services. People would get access to counselors at firms that would offer help with updating resumes, job-search tactics, interview coaching, etc. Basically, employers outsourced the process of helping former employees find new jobs. 

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  • 5 KEYS TO CARING PERSONALLY WHILE CHALLENGING DIRECTLY

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Uncategorized

    Balancing between caring
    personally and challenging colleagues directly during the pandemic is more
    important than ever, as many employees find themselves being informal
    coaches/mentors for one another.

    We’re listening to “ZOOMed” stories
    that can be hard to hear and responding to emotions that are hard to witness.

    To keep your workplace resilient, it’s important to elevate your approach to employee communication by focusing on all the good things happening across your business.

    Here are five ways to give employees the tools they need to support their clients, teams and themselves during this difficult and unprecedented time.

    Don’t withhold information

    It’s tempting when you’re
    exhausted or uncomfortable to avoid telling people what they need to know,
    however, this isn’t good for anyone. The people I have spoken with who are the
    least stressed about their work situations are those whose bosses have been
    clear about the state of the company and have shown a vested interest in their
    employees’ wellbeing. One of the best ways to show that you care personally
    about your employees is to be honest with them about things that affect
    them. 

    It’s important to recognize
    that being the boss can be exhausting during the best of times, and during
    times of crisis, it can feel downright paralyzing. But, when you do have
    information that affects your team, commit to delivering it as soon as possible
    in a way that’s kind and clear. For example, if you know you’re going to be
    laying people off, tell them as soon as you can, on a video call, and commit to
    checking in with them after they’ve left the company to see how they’re doing.

    Give everyone a voice

    Be conscious of how much time
    you are talking versus other people in meetings when you work from home. If
    you’re taking up more than your fair share of time, try to be more quiet. If
    you are not speaking up, remember that it is an act of generosity to share what
    you are thinking. If you are leading the meeting, consider occasionally just
    going person by person in alphabetical order.

    According to research from Google’s
    Project Aristotle, teams that speak roughly an equal amount of time perform
    better than teams where one person takes up all the airtime. If you find that
    some people are dominating meetings and others don’t make a peep, change the
    way you run the meeting. Start by checking in with everyone to give them a
    chance to talk, then ask people what they think by name throughout the meeting.

    Ask what can be done better

    Most people in the workforce
    today have never lived through a pandemic, so it can be hard to know what
    you’re getting right and what you’re getting wrong. Ask your team to tell you.
    Start by saying something like, “What’s something I can do to make things
    easier for you?” or “What’s something I am doing during this crisis that’s
    making things more difficult for you?”

    You might be met with silence.
    Fight the urge to speak first. Count to seven and commit to allowing the other
    person to speak first. When it’s clear you’re not going to break the silence,
    the other person will speak up to fill the silence.

    It will be easier for them to
    say something than to say nothing. Once the person starts talking, listen with
    the Intent to understand versus to respond. When they’re finished speaking,
    check for understanding.

    You can say something like,
    “So what I hear you saying is…” Repeat back to them the issues they have
    raised, as you understand them. Ask, “Do I have that right?” 

    Finally, you want to Reward
    the Candor in a way that’s specific and sincere. First, thank them for the
    criticism. If you agree with the criticism, make visible changes based on the
    feedback. If the change is hard or will take some time, show them you’re
    working toward it. If you disagree with the criticism, try finding something
    they’ve said that you do agree with and point it out. Offer your full,
    respectful explanation of why you disagree with their other statements. This is
    a way to reward their feedback and gives them an opportunity to consider your
    perspective.

    Following these steps will
    help you create a culture of Psychological Safety where people will feel
    comfortable raising important issues not only during a crisis, but every day..

    Take a break

    All over the world, leaders
    are being called upon to listen to stories that are hard to hear and to respond
    to emotions that are hard to witness. Showing compassion is real work, and,
    like all real work, it is equal parts rewarding and taxing. 

    Caring for others starts with
    caring for yourself. Don’t beat yourself up if you’re feeling burned out. Give
    yourself the break you need. You can’t possibly Care Personally about others if
    you’re running on empty.

    ‘Release judgment’

    If you’re having a difficult
    time with your boss or a peer and you’re feeling frustrated before a
    conversation, my Radical Candor co-founder Jason Rosoff gave me this advice:
    release judgment.

    Go into each situation
    assuming good intent versus that the other person wants to cause you harm.
    Things are difficult for everyone right now and many people don’t realize how
    their behavior might affect others. This is why Radical Candor is so important.
    It allows you to deliver feedback in a way that’s kind, clear, and non-judgmental.

    The post 5 keys to caring personally while challenging directly appeared first on HR Morning.

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  • IGNORING DISABLED CANDIDATES IS YOUR IMPAIRMENT, NOT THEIRS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: disability, DisruptHR, diversity, Featured

    Nate Elliott has sailed 15,000 miles across three oceans. But what’s even more noteworthy is that his trips all included people of mixed abilities. Some were in wheelchairs, some had multiple sclerosis, others were visually and hearing impaired, and so forth. As Elliott, founder and principal of Nineteen Insights, points out, if such individuals can survive at sea — icebergs, the Bermuda Triangle, you name it — they can thrive at your organization.

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  • AVOIDING COVID-19 LAWSUITS AND REPUTATIONAL DAMAGE AS EMPLOYEES RETURN TO WORK

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Uncategorized

    As organizations of all kinds prepare to reopen facilities and bring employees back onsite as the COVID-19 crisis eases, HR pros need to be ready to advise leadership of both potential legal risks and how to protect against long-term damage to their reputation.

    And there is one risk factor that many executives, and even legal
    counsel, are not yet thinking about – states and local governments are taking a
    larger role in protecting workers from the coronavirus with new rules and
    acting on their behalf in other, non-regulatory, ways as well.

    As detailed in a recent paper for the Harvard Law School’s National Employment Law Project (NELP), state and local governments are now examining how they can safeguard workers in their jurisdictions with COVID-19 exposure protection rules that go beyond federal laws and regulatory standards.

    COVID-19 safety naming and shaming

    For example, in addition to actively enforcing state laws, especially in high-risk industries, state government agencies may begin collaborating with worker organizations and publicizing enforcement actions to “name and shame” employers who don’t adequately protect workers from the coronavirus.

    Employers should also expect active efforts to publicize and enforce any state and local requirements for updating COVID-19-related safety plans and creating employer/employee safety committees.

    Increased whistleblower protections for workers who report unsafe conditions due to poor coronavirus protections are also likely in many states.

    Employers may also face COVID-19-related public nuisance lawsuits.

    The NELP report states, “In April, two public interest law
    organizations filed suit … based on the risk of community spread of COVID-19
    resulting from the companies’ failure to comply with CDC guidelines in their
    plants. The lawsuit sought no money damages, only safer working conditions.”

    The suits were dismissed on procedural grounds, but the publicity forced coronavirus protection changes at the plants.

    States using soft powers to protect workers from coronavirus

    In addition to tracking any new local and state-level coronavirus safety rules, however, employers need to be aware that states are also examining whether to use “soft powers” to help improve workplace safety:

    The report details potential government interventions that employers
    should anticipate, including:

    • Helping with informal mediation to improve conditions in unsafe workplaces;
    • Educating workers, employers, and the general public about applicable laws and measures for workplace safety;
    • Disclosing information about employers who are endangering workers and the public, so that customers and others can be aware of this conduct;
    • Convening stakeholders, including employers, workers, or their representatives, to strategize about how to create safe workplaces;
    • Collaborating closely with worker organizations, like unions, worker centers, and others.

    Getting ahead of the curve

    For all employers, the best way to avoid both legal and
    reputational risks related to COVID-19 is to understand and implement worker and
    customer protection best practices.

    That is also the best way to keep your employees focused and productive as they navigate a fresh set of challenges around returning to work while the coronavirus crisis continues impacting their personal lives with closed daycares and schools, drops in household income and other challenges.

    One possible positive outcome for HR? A chance to show your partners, clients and prospective recruits that you are who they want to do business with.

    By publicizing that your organization is doing everything you can to protect workers and customers from the coronavirus – and highlighting the positive impact that’s having on your ability to keep your business moving through the COVID-19 crisis – you can boost your reputation as an employer, increase awareness among potential clients and partners, and help secure future growth and success.

    The post Avoiding COVID-19 lawsuits and reputational damage as employees return to work appeared first on HR Morning.

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  • SURVEY MONKEY: EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION IS UP – A SMIDGE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Uncategorized

    CNBC and SurveyMonkey together polled over
    9,000 workers in the U.S. to measure the impacts of COVID-19 on employee
    satisfaction. Nearly half of all respondents (48%) noted they are currently
    doing their jobs remotely. Among all workers—working at home or not—the latest
    results show an uptick in employee happiness: the survey’s Workforce Happiness
    Index is an optimistic 73 out of 100 as of May 2020, ticking up from 71 last
    year.

     As states and businesses begin to reopen, the
    survey provides insights on how America’s workforce feels about the way their
    employers are handling the crisis and preparing to keep them safe, engaged, and
    effective on the job. While workers express they are happier than they were
    before the pandemic, they also say their jobs have gotten harder.

    Key findings from the May 2020 CNBC/SurveyMonkey Workforce Survey include:

    • Sentiment among all workers:
      • Over half (54%) of all workers surveyed say it has
        gotten “somewhat harder” or “much harder” to do their job effectively
        compared with before the coronavirus outbreak.

        • The perceived hardship does not differ by gender,
          age, or whether workers have been able to work remotely in recent weeks.
        • Those in positions of greater responsibility (VP and
          higher) are more likely to say work has gotten “much harder.”
      • Still, happiness across a number of dimensions is up:
        • 54% of workers say they are “very satisfied” with their
          job, up from 47% the last time the survey was given (December 2019.).
        • By a better than three-to-one margin (38% to 11%)
          more workers indicate that they are happier in their role since the
          pandemic started than say they now wish they had a different job. 
    • Sentiment among remote workers:
      • 44% of those working remotely are happier to have
        their job now than they were before the outbreak.
      • 88% are confident that their organization’s leadership
        is making the right business decisions to manage through the current
        environment.
      • 18% have considered quitting their job in the last
        three months.
      • 38% say they would like to work from home more often
        than they used to once things are safe again. Another 19% want to
        continue working from home all the time. These numbers are pretty much
        equal across all age groups. 
    • Sentiment among non-remote workers:
      • 32% are happier to have their job now than they were
        before the outbreak.
      • 79% are confident their organization’s leadership is
        making the right business decisions to manage through the current
        environment.
      • 22% have considered quitting their job in the last
        three months.
      • 75% say they’ve felt safe going to work during the
        pandemic.
      • 80% are satisfied with measures their company has put
        in place to keep them safe at work.

    Job satisfaction is up but there is also
    widespread anxiety among those with jobs today,” said Jon Cohen, SurveyMonkey’s
    chief research officer. “Fully 44 percent of workers report being worried that
    they’ll lose a job or have their hours cut in the weeks ahead, with concern
    spiking to about six in 10 among Hispanic and Asian workers.” 

     To download the CNBC|SurveyMonkey Workforce
    Survey template to help measure employee job satisfaction at your organization,
    go to: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/cnbc-surveymonkey-workforce-survey-template.
     

    The post Survey Monkey: Employee satisfaction is up – a smidge appeared first on HR Morning.

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  • ARE YOU A GLASSNECK WHEN IT COMES TO GLASSDOOR?

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: culture, Employee Branding, Featured, glassdoor, Social Media Management

    With less reqs to fill right now, this is a good time to turn your attention to other ways to add value to hiring efforts. One of those is addressing your employer brand on Glassdoor. But I beg of you: Don’t do more harm than good.

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  • THE “WORLD’S FASTEST ASSESSMENT” AIMS TO GROW ITS INFLUENCE 

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, Hourly, Screening & Assessment, technology, traitify

    What can you learn about a candidate in 90 seconds? That’s the $12 million question.

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  • COURT: WORKER’S SALARY AND DUTIES CLEARLY EXEMPTED HIM FROM RECEIVING OT PAY

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Uncategorized

    Employers can get into a lot of trouble when they require
    employees to do extra work and not compensate them for it.

    But in order for it to be an FLSA violation, the employee
    has to be eligible for overtime.

    No detailed analysis required

    Daniel Smith worked as an organ procurement coordinator for Ochsner Health System. He sued his employer, claiming it violated the FLSA and he was owed unpaid overtime.

    But after taking a closer look at both his salary and job
    duties, a district court ruled that Smith was exempt from overtime, and on
    appeal, the 5th Circuit agreed.

    First, the court explained Smith’s job included procurement,
    which is a duty listed under the FLSA’s administrative exemption – something
    which made him ineligible for overtime pay.

    The 5th Circuit went on to say a detailed analysis of Smith’s job duties wasn’t necessary due to his salary: $120,000 a year. Smith earned well above the FLSA overtime threshold, making him exempt from OT pay.

    Misclassification can be a costly mistake for employers, so
    it’s a good idea to double-check all your workers’ pay and duties to ensure
    they’re being properly compensated.

    Cite: Smith v. Ochsner Health System, 4/17/20.

    The post Court: Worker’s salary and duties clearly exempted him from receiving OT pay appeared first on HR Morning.

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