FEEDBACK

  • 4 SIGNS TOP TALENT MAY LEAVE: BEST STRATEGIES TO KEEP THEM

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: departing employees, engagement, feedback, In this week's e-newsletter, recognition, retention, Retention & Turnover, retention strategies, Talent Management

    There are few things an HR pro dreads more than when a great employee hands in their notice. The challenge of having to replace them can be overwhelming. 

    And in this tight labor market, landing new top talent is no easy task, making retention an important priority.

    Luckily, there are usually signs a valued employee might be thinking about jumping ship, and some proactive steps you can take to try and keep them.

    Subtle signs

    Experts agree there are a lot of reasons great employees decide they need to move on. Apart from salary, boredom and a lack of recognition and engagement are the biggest issues causing workers to seek employment elsewhere.

    While it might seem sudden and jarring when an employee announces their resignation, there were most likely subtle signs it was coming.

    Here are the main ones to watch out for, according to Janine Popick, Chief Marketing Officer of Dasheroo:

    1. Private calls during work. Everyone needs to take private calls in the office from time to time, but if someone seems to be answering the phone in hushed tones and dashing to the nearest empty office frequently, that’s probably a sign your employee is interviewing somewhere else.

    2. Declining work ethic. Many employees mentally check out before they leave a job. While there could be personal issues causing a change in attitude, if an employee seems less enthusiastic and is consistently only doing the bare minimum, they’re most likely ready to move on.

    3. Lack of socialization. Someone actively wanting to leave probably won’t go out of their way to make chit chat with co-workers or be overly friendly anymore. Pay attention to any employee who’s suddenly keeping to themselves more than usual.

    4. More activity on social networks. If you’re worried an employee may be getting ready to leave, take a peek at their online presence. Is their LinkedIn page completely updated and polished? Are their tweets looking more professional than personal? This kind of online activity could be an indicator an employee is trying to make a good impression on a new employer.

    While it may be too late to convince some people to stay, there are still steps you can take to prevent talent from leaving in the future, according to HR Daily Advisor.

    Presenting new challenges

    Boredom is what’ll disengage your workers the fastest and cause them to seek a new project elsewhere. To get a basic idea of where your employees stand, an engagement survey is a great tool to see who needs a change.

    An easy fix is to ask your people if they’d like to tackle different types of assignments. The more you keep things fresh for them, the more likely they are to remain engaged.

    Another way to avoid boredom: See who’s due for a promotion. If someone’s been stuck in the same position for so long they’ve grown tired of it, see if there’s a new opportunity for them. The new responsibility could be just what they needed to respark their enthusiasm.

    Recognition, feedback

    When your people don’t feel appreciated, they’ll have no qualms about leaving the company. To correct this, it’s important to give frequent feedback and let people know when they’ve done a good job.

    Gallup research shows employees who are praised are more committed to their work and organizations. Even just quick feedback, positive or negative, can motivate employees and boost their engagement.

    Extra communication can only make employees feel more connected to the company.

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  • NEW RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS KEY TO SUCCESSFUL FEEDBACK AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Employee performance, feedback, Latest News & Views, Management, Performance Management, Performance Managemnt, Retention & Turnover, Talent Management

    Performance management theory and practice is among the fastest-evolving areas of human resources. New research from corporate performance think tanks reflects recent psychological insights into the power – and drawbacks – of how we provide performance feedback to employees.

    Most of us are familiar with the concept of the “flight or fight” response to anything that is perceived as a threat. That response comes from one of the oldest and least evolved structures in the human brain. Unfortunately, although understandably, most humans respond to even well-intentioned criticism much the same way they’d react to a physical threat — they switch from thinking to reacting. And that isn’t a one-way street. Research shows that both giving and receiving feedback are stressful — they feel like conflict and we prepare and react accordingly.

    That has a real impact on how employees — and supervisors — perceive performance management, whether that’s in the form of an annual sit down that ends with numerical rankings or continuous communication models where supervisors are giving regular feedback to workers on a weekly or even daily basis.

    Flipping the feedback loop

    So, is there a solution to this deeply seated, brain-based problem? According to research published by the NeuroLeadership Institute (NLI) , the trick is to flip the feedback loop on its head.

    Instead of structuring performance discussions around GIVING feedback, the researchers recommend training everyone — employees, supervisors, managers and execs —to instead ASK for feedback on a regular basis. That puts the asker in a position of control and reduces the stress reaction. It also means that everyone needs to think about specific aspects of the job they want to discuss.

    NLI’s research indicates that encouraging a common habit of thoughtful and honest communication by changing your feedback model can help form a healthy organizational culture. Other research by the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) and the Center for Effective Organizations (CEO) supports the idea that organizational and financial results improve when positive and productive goal setting, performance assessments and career development conversations result in better employee motivation, engagement and retention.

    HR pros often struggle to get managers and employees to treat performance management as a positive opportunity for growth rather than an unavoidable, but deeply uncomfortable, ritual. Taking a fresh approach to how you think about feedback might make a real difference.

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  • 3 RULES TO MAKE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT MORE EFFECTIVE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, feedback, Performance Management

    As humans our core values define and shape us and serve as internal beacons to guide our actions and behaviors. It is the same for any organization’s values. Values are vitally important to the ongoing culture and success of any company, so it’s necessary to actively bring those values to life in the form of operational practices.

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  • YOU CAN HELP MANAGERS BE BETTER MANAGERS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, feedback, leadership

    Everyone is aware of friction when it exists in the office. Whether it’s an undercurrent you feel or scuttlebutt around the water cooler, you want to shout out why can’t we all just get along? Consider that your leadership may be the reason people aren’t getting along.

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  • HOW KEEPING NOTES MAKES PERFORMANCE CONVERSATIONS MORE EFFECTIVE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Evaluations, Reviews & Appraisal, Featured, feedback, Performance Management, Talent Management

    Successful teams are made up of individuals with unique ambitions, strengths, and personalities. The secret to being a great leader is the ability to identify and leverage these differences to create a complementary and motivated workforce.

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  • 7 WAYS TO MAKE YOUR PROJECT FAIL AND 7 WAYS TO PREVENT THAT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Change Management, feature, feedback, HR Insights, Organizational Leadership

    Wonder why some projects fail while others are successful? Like the 7 deadly sins, this article from Toledo Solutions lists 7 of the most common ways to ensure a project fail — and they all come down to people and managers. Read on to learn what you can do to encourage your team and improve your chance of success.

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  • HR ROUNDTABLE: HOW CAN WE IMPROVE FEEDBACK?

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, feedback, HR Insights, HR Roundtable

    When we got together for the August Cincinnati HR Roundtable, people were excited to talk about the topic more than usual. We were going to discuss feedback. The room was full of energy because people have had different experiences with feedback both positive and negative.

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  • 10 MUST-HAVE FEATURES FOR YOUR PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Evaluations, Reviews & Appraisal, Featured, feedback, Performance Management

    HR departments across nearly all industries are constantly trying to improve systems and processes to help increase employee engagement, recruit and retain talent, and operate on a more efficient and cost-effective basis each day. Performance management software is one of the smartest solutions for these persistent issues. With the help of performance management software, companies have the ability to simplify and accelerate the performance review and appraisal process while giving some power back to the employees.

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  • THE MOST COMMON MISTAKES MANAGERS MAKE AND HOW TO FIX THEM

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, feedback, Managers, Talent Management

    I’ve trained thousands of managers in different industries, with different levels of seniority and experience, with teams large and small. And, while they certainly all have their unique nuances, I see some of the same manager mistakes popping up consistently, over and over again.

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  • WITH PRACTICE AND THE RIGHT APPROACH, FEEDBACK CAN BE A GIFT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Evaluations, Reviews & Appraisal, Featured, feedback, Performance & Personality

    Annual performance reviews are controversial. Some people praise them in public, but most hate them in private.

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