HIRING & RECRUITING

  • ‘JUST TEXT ME’: NEW WAY TO INTERVIEW

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Hiring & Recruiting, Talent Management

    Having trouble hiring? Who isn’t, with the tight job market, being ghosted by candidates and just the complete overhaul in the hiring process the last several years?

    And now there’s a new hiring practice: Job interviews by texting.

    If you adhere to certain guidelines, interviews by texting can be a really useful, and convenient, tool to add to the mix. It can even speed the process along, particularly when managing multiple candidates for a job.

    Here’s how interviews by texting might work: A recruiter would set up a time to text back and forth with a candidate. Then the interviewer sends the candidate a question, waits for a response and asks the next question, and so on.

    Attracts millennials, Gen Zers

    Texting might be particularly useful as a first-time discussion to weed out unqualified candidates. And it can boost recruiting efforts for attracting millennial and Gen Z candidates.

    There are even a growing number of technology companies, such as Mya.com and Canvas (gocanvas.io), that offer text messaging tools. For example, you can send an automated text, asking “You applied to a job last month. We have a new opportunity. Do you have a minute to chat?”

    Rather than trying to accommodate a candidate’s current work schedule, employers can cut “approximately half of that time spent by communicating through text,” says Fisher Phillips Employment Attorney Erin Price on SHRM.

    Here are a few best practices from recruiters who’ve been hiring by text:

    Consider the position. Use texting for more junior positions. “You probably don’t want to recruit your chief financial officer via text,” says Gwen Moran, author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Business Plans.


    Ask first.
    “We always speak to our candidates via phone first, and then ask if it’s okay to text,” says Michael Sunderland, CEO, Full Stack Talent. It’s best to have a conversation to ensure the candidate completely understands the format of the interview or pre-interview.

    Develop a text message policy. Specify how and when to initiate contact through text. Most employers suggest keeping it professional. In other words, no slang, abbreviations or acronyms.

    “While texting is an informal medium, you’re still trying to impress each other,” says Moran.

    Save text communications. Use recruitment marketing software to keep all communications in one place – including applications, email communication, notes and text messages.

    Diligent recordkeeping will also protect the company should a candidate, for instance, not get hired and threaten a discrimination lawsuit.

    The post ‘Just text me’: New way to interview appeared first on HR Morning.

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  • TALENT ACQUISITION: 3 WAYS HR CAN GUIDE THOSE PICKY HIRING MANAGERS IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: hiring, Hiring & Recruiting, In this week's e-newsletter, recruiting, talent acquisition

    Your people make or break your company, but finding the right hire in this tight labor market is a big challenge for HR pros. 

    Something that can make it even more difficult? A meddling manager with unrealistic expectations about their ideal new hire and how the process should go.

    Problematic requests

    This is what John Vlastelica, founder of online hiring resource Recruiting Toolbox, addressed at the recent ERE Recruiting Conference in San Diego.

    According to Vlastelica, managers can be HR’s (and their own) worst enemy when it comes to choosing a candidate. Sometimes, they’re overly picky. Other times, they want the hiring process to move too quickly.

    If you start hitting hiring road bumps with your managers, it’s important to take a step back and evaluate the situation, Vlastelica says.

    When your manager makes an unreasonable request, what are they really asking you for?

    Vlastelica highlighted three common misconceptions managers have about the hiring process and how you can adjust their expectations.

    1. The more resumes, the better

    You may encounter a manager who wants you to keep passing along a giant stack of resumes. After all, the more choices, the better – right?

    Wrong, according to Vlastelica. While you don’t want to just select the first decent candidate, too many choices will be overwhelming. No one can properly compare a dozen different applicants.

    Vlastelica suggests giving your managers three to five strong candidates. If you receive pushback from a manager who wants more options, focus on selling the applicants you’ve already selected. You picked them for a reason – explain why to your manager.

    If a manager isn’t pleased with anyone after conducting several interviews, it can indicate problems lurking in the middle of the
    hiring process.

    If that’s the case, Vlastelica says to think about what’s going wrong in the interviews that’s causing your manager to want to start fresh.

    If there’s a disconnect during the interview process, more resumes won’t help fix your hiring problem.

    What might be going wrong in the interview process? Hireology CEO Adam Robinson says not giving candidates enough attention can be employers’ downfall. You may try to get back to your applicants as quickly as possible, but it just takes one or two bad reviews on Glassdoor to discourage quality candidates from applying.

    If you don’t treat candidates as you would clients, you’ll never get the top talent you need.

    2. Cultural fit is highly important.

    When looking at different candidates, it can be tempting to choose whoever will fit into the company culture best, Vlastelica says. But you want to steer your managers away from making the same hire.

    Robinson agrees, and warns against hiring someone just because they “seem like the right fit.” It’s crucial to have tangible criteria to determine whether a candidate would be a good hire. Think about what skills and traits lead to success in the role you need filled, and how you’d test for them.

    Another reason to ignore “good fit” hires? Not enough diversity. Too often, diversity is seen as something simply “nice to have” instead of a necessity. But, hiring people with different backgrounds and skill sets can add a lot to the company’s culture and success.

    When a manager wants you to find a hire who’s a carbon copy of other employees, Vlastelica suggests you remind them that a different hire will add something unique and push thinking in a new direction.

    3. A large panel of interviewers is best.

    If you have a manager who is indecisive or lacks confidence, they may try and compensate by including a lot of people in the interview process to ensure the best candidate
    is chosen.

    While other opinions can help, Vlastelica says too many interviewers will back you into a corner. If your company requires a consensus to make a hire, you’re setting yourself up for failure by including a ton of people in the decision.

    Not to mention, taking everyone’s schedules into account while setting up an interview can be a nightmare.

    Vlastelica suggests thinking about the importance of the hiring decision when deciding how many interviewers to include in the process.

    An entry-level position? One or two people works. A potential C-suite member? You’ll want to include four or five people in the decision.

     

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  • HIRING MANAGER SAYS NO ‘THANK YOU’ EMAIL IS A DEAL BREAKER AND GETS AN EARFUL ON TWITTER

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Answers to Tricky HR Questions, Discrimination & Harassment, Hiring & Recruiting, recruiting, workplace diversity

    Hard and fast rules about hiring could be hurting your ability to attract talent, especially if they seem arbitrary or exclusionary.

    That issue came to the fore in a Twitter thread in early April. Business Insider Managing Editor Jessica Liebman tweeted out a link to her story on the BI website with the long and attention-grabbing headline “I’ve been hiring people for 10 years, and I still swear by a simple rule: If someone doesn’t send a thank-you email, don’t hire them.” If you do, she assures readers in the story, you’ll probably regret it.

    Every recruiting and hiring manager has specific traits and personality types in mind when they start vetting job candidates. But many people responding to Liebman’s tweet pointed out  how unconscious assumptions can hurt efforts to find and hire the best and most diverse possible workforce.

    “Good eggs”

    Liebman argues that failing to follow this point of etiquette tells her that prospects don’t really want the job. The organization and effort and “manners” demonstrated by hunting down an email address and sending the thank you puts people on her “good egg” list. Liebman reiterated that she stands by her policy to use “the thank-you email as a barrier to entry.”

    The twitterverse, or at least one small corner of it, reacted quickly and strongly. The apparent consensus was not positive.

    Workplace advice blogger Alison Greene tweeted from her @askamanager account,”Hard disagree. And it’ll discriminate against candidates from backgrounds where they don’t get this kind of job search training, which has nothing to do with skills & ability to excel on the job.”

    Software company Glitch’s CEO Anil Dash chimed in with, “The only thing a thank you note represents to me is what the norms are for the social class and cultural background of that candidate. It’s nice to get one, but literally doesn’t factor into the decision at all, and shouldn’t. I’ve been hiring people for 20+ years.”

    Others took issue in a sarcastic  tone. Freelance writer and artist Christian Fox’s Twitter persona Goth Ms. Frizzle offered a slightly higher barrier for applicants: “I’ve been hiring people for 100 years and I still swear by this simple rule, if you can’t descend into the labrynth of eternal night and retrieve the silver knife that slit the throat of god as he slept in his garden you’re not getting the job.”

    Filtering out the “unwashed?”

    Other responses pointed to cultural norms, socio-economic status, or cognitive differences as possible reasons that an applicant might not send a thank you after an initial interview. Many questioned any link between sending a note and ability to do a job well or work well with others. And many tweeters saw the policy as a gatekeeping measure that, intentionally or not, was likely to disproportionately exclude people of color and applicants with less access to career advice.

    A lawyer tweeted, “I have non-professional parents and I didn’t learn that thank you notes were an unspoken requirement/tool for filtering out the unwashed until my first year of law school. ”

    As of April 8, Liebman had not responded directly to any of the thousands of comments her tweet elicited, but Business Insider Global Editor in Chief Nicholas Carlson took the time to tweet out his own take on the article, saying, “I’m surprised how many people are surprised by this excellent advice” and “For their sakes I hope it’s a helpful wake up call.” To a suggestion that his response showed a lack of introspection, Carlson added “Lol, no. I don’t think that’s it.”

    Impact of unintended bias

    As negative reaction to the article and ensuing tweets gathered steam, Carlson later responded more seriously to a tweeted request from @writersofcolor  for “recent staff diversity stats in order to provide some context for this hiring practice?” by stating, “Thank you for this question. With respect to race and ethnicity, 28% of our teammates identify themselves as people of color. Three years ago, this percentage was 20%. Within our newsrooms, 30% of staff identify as people of color, up from 25% three years ago.” Carlson said “For context, according to Pew, 22% of people who work in US newsrooms are people of color. This is in no way ‘mission accomplished’ for us; we continue to prioritize hiring people of color.” He did not address Liebman’s specific hiring record.

    Whatever HR pros think of the original tweet — including whether it was just a successful “clickbait” campaign for the publisher — the reaction highlights how important it is to continually re-examine interviewing and hiring procedures for unintended bias that might limit diversity and opportunity.

     

     

     

     

     

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  • KEEPING UP TO DATE ON 6 CRITICAL HR ACTIVITIES

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Discrimination & Harassment, Employment Law, FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act), FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act), Hiring & Recruiting, onboarding

    How can you find the information you need to be sure you’re compliant with changes in relevant laws and regulations? The best way is to identify at least one reliable source of information for each of the six primary “buckets” of HR: Hiring, Discipline, Termination, Recordkeeping and Retention, Administering Policies and Procedures and Legal Updates.

    Review these at least once a year to make sure they are still meeting your needs.

    Hiring

    Remember, hiring is HR’s greatest responsibility and the source of greatest value to any organization. If you’re successful attracting great employees, you’ll spend far less time with discipline and terminations. “Hire smart and fire less” should be your motto.

    Once you’ve found a promising candidate, carefully targeted and structured interviews are key. Make sure you have a set of specific questions for each position.

    Guides to conducting patterned interviews and other hiring tools are readily available online, in books and from HR software companies and consultants.

    Discipline and termination

    This is one of those places that having a ready-to-use template can help a lot. Best example is a Performance Improvement Plan, or PIP, template. Having it set up in advance helps you to cover all necessary bases with your PIPs and ensure your process complies with all applicable laws and regulations. The same goes for other disciplinary and termination notices. Sources for free standard form templates that you can customize include government agencies, law firms, and business associations. Check your HR software packages for any that are included.

    Recordkeeping and retention

    It is critical that you know and follow all local, state, and federal requirements for recordkeeping and retention. What records must you make and what forms are required? How long must you keep them? Almost all HR records must be kept at least three years, but many must be kept longer. Which records need to be kept separately to preserve confidentiality? Which must be destroyed and how? Which ones can just be discarded? Are there different requirements for physical and electronic documents? Government websites and local business associations are good sources for this information. Also look for law firm blogs, articles and other resources.

    Administering Policies and Procedures

    When it comes to administering your workplace policies and ensuring procedures are followed, the simple rule of thumb is to review them regularly and enforce them in a way that’s fair, equitable and consistent. It’s important that you look at your employee handbook and other policy documents at least once a year to be sure they are up to date and comply with any legal or regulatory changes.

    Legal and regulatory updates

    Keeping your policies up to date doesn’t have to be expensive. In fact, outside of the time you’ve scheduled for your policy reviews, it often costs you nothing but a little upfront prep time. In addition to the government sources noted below, most HR-focused law firms offer blogs and send out email alerts when regulations change or court decisions impact labor and employment laws. You want to get alerts whenever something changes.

    Ask around at your local HR association or chamber of commerce to ID the best sources and sign up. Add any useful blogs to your Internet bookmarks and set up a folder to collect any email alerts that come in. That way, when you’re ready to check for changes, everything will already be in one place for you to review. If you prefer hard copy, print out alerts as they come in and store them in individual binders.

    Staying compliant takes time but will save you money

    If you ever get pushback on the time required to keep your department up to date and in compliance, talk about it in a language your leadership will understand – money.

    Research shows about 89 percent of employers who get to court lose. The ones that don’t get to court have already settled, usually for big bucks. According to employment liability insurer Hiscox, small and mid-sized organizations pay an average of $160,000 to defend and settle employment claims.

    And why do they lose? The most common reasons are a lack of written policies, failing to follow the policies they have written, lack of training for managers and supervisors and ignorance.

    Beyond discrimination claims, employers often find themselves on the hook for payouts because they misclassify employees and therefore pay them incorrectly, violating mandated hour and leave policies, and failures by supervisors and managers.

    One area where you should keep managers and supervisors out of the picture entirely is filling out unemployment claims. Fewer than a third know enough to catch errors that will cost your organization. Make sure you handle it in HR. It’s a lot of work, but it’s less work than defending a mistake later.

    Why Most Employment Claims Are Filed

    Here’s a list of the laws and topics that come up most often in workers’ claims (and a good list reference for setting up alerts):

    • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act
      • Equal employment opportunity
      • Discrimination practices in hiring, disciplining and terminations
    • ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act)
    • ADEA (Age Discrimination in Employment Act)
    • Religious discrimination
    • Sexual discrimination
    • Pregnancy discrimination
    • Race, color and national origin discrimination
    • Equal Pay Act
    • Fair Labor Standards Act
      • Misclassification of workers –exempt vs. nonexempt and employee vs. contractor
      • Overtime violations
      • Miscalculations of pay
    • Sexual harassment

    Where to find additional HR resources

    • www.dol.gov
    • www.eeoc.gov
    • www.uscis.gov
    • www.nlrb.gov, and other government websites
    • State Chambers of Commerce
    • HR Consultants
    • Industry and professional associations and HR industry events
    • Law firm blogs, websites and newsletters

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  • TEMPS: YOUR NEW BEST SOURCE FOR SOLID WORKERS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: fringe benefits, fringe benefits|Hiring & Recruiting|IT|temps, Hiring & Recruiting, IT, temps

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  • EFFECTIVE SCREENING TACTICS WHEN RECRUITING TOP TALENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Hiring & Recruiting, Special Report

    As the talent market tightens, the pressure on HR to recruit, hire and retain high-performing employees is more intense than ever.

    Companies of all sizes are seeking that perfect employee as the demand for talent quickly exceeds the supply.

    You’ve no doubt heard that the cost of hiring the wrong person is significant – up to 200% of the employee’s annual salary. Some costs are unquantifiable, such as the potential loss of revenue by a poorly performing employee who may lose you good customers while also dragging down the people around him.

    A study by Progressive Business Publications found that many hiring managers ask job candidates the same questions today as they did 20 years ago.

    Questions like “Where do you want to be in five years?” have little value in measuring the skill level required for success right-now-today!

    Here are some ideas to help hiring managers take steps now to maintain a consistent pipeline of talented job applicants, starting with the hiring interview.

    Effective Screening Procedures

     There are a number of effective screening procedures, including a long line of vendors that supply personality and aptitude tests. Despite all of the advanced assessment tools, interviews by your recruiting team remain the most effective way to weed out the bad fits and identify superstars.

    Before scheduling face-to-face time with all the candidates under consideration, conduct telephone interviews and refine the final list.

    It’s important to have an efficient and effective method for conducting phone interviews.

    Telephone screening will help recruiting managers determine if a candidate has what it takes to move to the next level in the hiring process and save valuable time interviewing unqualified candidates.

    Effective screening will also reduce the time spent in the overall hiring process and spare the inconvenience of travel for those who do not qualify.

    All recruiting managers should have a simple and effective interview process that aligns with the technical skills, experience, soft skills and problem-solving skills for the job being filled.

    Making sure there’s a comfortable environment for candidates to interview in before they arrive is a good start. The recruiting team should spend a few minutes chatting informally to put the candidates at ease.

    5 Ways to be most effective:

    1. Set a goal of having the applicant do 80% of the talking.
    2. Learn to differentiate good information from sizzle. Good information usually contains specific behaviors the candidate has engaged in. Sizzle sounds good, but means little and serves to falsify the

    evaluation.

    1. Be comfortable with silence after a question is asked. This will allow the candidate time to think and take initiative.
    2. Display energy and show enthusiasm for the job being filled.
    3. Prepare for the interview by reviewing the candidates’ resume and by rehearsing what you want to ask.

    5 Common mistakes to watch for

    Here are the top five common interviewing mistakes made by recruiting managers:

    1. Failure to develop up-front contact with the applicant. If the ground rules for the job aren’t established at the start, the interview will fail.
    2. Failure to tell it like it is. Some managers oversell the job, which ends in disappointment for the applicant and the manager.
    3. Failure to match the applicant’s ability to the job. Out of desperation, overqualified candidates may accept a job below their capabilities, while underqualified ones will promise anything to get a job.
    4. Failure to allow enough time for the interview. Rushing an interview will only lead to hiring mistakes.
    5. Failure to interview the “real” person. Applicants rarely ask or answer the “real” questions upfront.

    Asking the right questions will uncover facades and help you learn more about the person sitting in front of you.

    Good questions and good answers

    While it’s essential to ask good questions, it’s equally important to know what “good answers” you want to hear, as well.

    Here are examples of 5 good questions you can ask, and answers how to best assess the answers you might get.

    1. How did you deal with the situation the last time your boss chastised you or strongly disagreed with you?

    Look for candidates who:

    • spoke directly to their boss about the issue
    • tried to find where the problem was coming from, and
    • resolved the issue quickly.

    Strong candidates aren’t interested in placing blame. Instead, they have the courage to admit they’ve made a mistake or could’ve done things

    differently. Misunderstandings happen. Good candidates keep the lines of communication open and resolve the issue.

    Red flag: Be wary of candidates who claim they’ve never had a problem with a former boss. It may indicate the candidate is strictly a “yes” person or is not totally forthcoming.

    1. Give an example of how you won over a key person in another department.

    There isn’t one best technique, but talented employees probably have developed their own framework to do this. The best candidates will be able to tell you what they’re trying to accomplish to help your business to move on to the next stage.

    Red flags: Watch out for candidates who appear too smooth and polished, but don’t get down to business fast enough. A common mistake is spending too much time on pleasantries in the opening.

    1. Give an example of a time when you went above and beyond the call of duty at work.

    This response will show how prepared applicants are for the job interview. They should be ready with pertinent examples of past successes, and how they met and exceeded customer/manager/co-worker expectations.

    Red flags: This is one of those responses that allows candidates to brag a little about past successes without sounding obnoxious. They may even produce notes from former customers/employers supporting their stories. If the interviewee can’t think of a story, it may indicate a poor candidate.

    1. Give a specific example of a time when you had to conform to a policy you didn’t like.

    With all the directives, instructions and policies being changed on a regular basis in the business world, it’s almost impossible for experienced go-getter not to have run into such a situation. How they handled the situation is critical. Did they go to their supervisor and explain why they didn’t like the policy? Did their explanation sound more like a confrontation than a discussion?

    Red flags: It’s OK for people to express concern about a policy and go to management to discuss clarification. It’s not OK if the objection sounds like a serious undermining of a working, established policy.

    1. Describe a time when your workload was heavy and how you handled it.

    Asking candidates to describe difficult situations and their reactions is called behavioral interviewing. It goes beyond basic technical skills and gets to the heart of how candidates will act if hired. The best job candidates must be able to react appropriately during rough times. Look for candidates who are able to prioritize critical tasks, and resolve them calmly and intelligently.

    Red flags: Candidates who spend a lot of time pointing figures at others in their past jobs will probably do the same at the next job.

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  • 7 WAYS HRMS CAN TRANSFORM YOUR HR DEPARTMENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: central database, Hiring & Recruiting, HRMS, Management, onboarding, Pay and Benefits, Payroll, Performance Managemnt, Retention & Turnover, self-service portal, streamline, Talent Management, turnover

    A typical day in HR is… anything but typical. Whether you’re dealing with an employee suddenly leaving or your CEO demanding results, you’re constantly on the move and putting out new fires.

    You’re busy, to say the least.

    And on top of it all, you still have to answer questions about payroll and keep up with compliance reporting. That leaves little room for higher-level responsibilities like scouting for new talent or developing strategies to motivate employees.

    No one needs to tell you that your time and energy are valuable. And your day shouldn’t be consumed with administrative or routine tasks. Whether you’re doing everything on pen and paper or using specialized software for recruiting or training, it’s time to consider a change.

    If you haven’t heard about HRMS, now is the time to check out the technology that can streamline HR and help you take back your day.

    What is HRMS?

    A human resource management system (HRMS) integrates all of the core and strategic HR functions into one solution, improves recruiting, offers a self-service portal, automates data entry and administrative processes, streamlines information in a central database, reduces payroll and compliance errors, and facilitates data-driven strategies.

    How is HRMS different from HRIS and HCM?

    HRMS, HRIS and HCM are various acronyms used for comprehensive HR technology. It’s easy to get confused, because these terms are often used inconsistently and interchangeably. That said, it’s still a good idea to know how they are generally defined. Here’s a breakdown of which modules are included in each one:

    • Human resource information system (HRIS) – applicant tracking, employee self-service portal, central database, analytics, training, compensation and benefits
    • Human capital management (HCM) ­– HRIS modules, plus onboarding and talent management
    • Human resource management system (HRMS) – HCM modules, plus payroll, time and attendance, and performance tracking

    HRMS has the most modules of any HR technology, but typically has fewer customizations and advanced features compared to specialized software that focuses on an individual module. What makes HRMS preferable, however, is that it’s an integrated system that can follow employees end-to-end from recruiting to exit interviews.

    Consider these seven ways that HRMS can transform your HR department.

    1. Manage the hiring process more efficiently

    We’ve previously written about the insights that applicant tracking systems (ATS) can provide, including:

    • Finding and solving hiring bottlenecks
    • Discovering which hiring managers need help
    • Tracking your hiring team’s efficiency and effectiveness
    • Determining your best sources for hires

    An HRMS solution won’t have as many specialized features as a dedicated ATS software, but it will have the benefit of retaining applicant information if they are hired and onboarded. You’ll also be able to analyze this data and generate reports on the types of candidates that ultimately become successful employees.

    2. Engage employees with onboarding and training

    Once you’ve hired the right candidate, it will be important for you to keep them engaged from the beginning. Employees that go through a structured onboarding program are 58% more likely to stay with an organization after three years.

    With HRMS, onboarding can start even before the new employee reaches the office. Employees can sign administrative documents electronically, catch up on company news and business goals, and join virtual social networks of colleagues. On their first day, they’ll have more time to tour the facility, set up their equipment and hit the ground running.

    HRMS solutions can also boost engagement through continuing education. For example, millennial employees ranked training and development as the most important benefit of working for a company, higher than cash bonuses, free health care and a pension.

    Small businesses may find hiring speakers or holding physical classes too expensive. HRMS offers a cost-effective alternative with e-learning modules to help employees improve their skills and performance at their own pace.

    This type of professional development not only promotes employee engagement, but also prepares future leaders within your company who might otherwise leave.

    3. Save time with a self-service portal

    Employees often have specific questions about their salaries, benefits and time off. Answering these vital yet routine questions, however, can take up a huge chunk of your day.

    With a self-service portal, employees can access their information any time, from a remote site or on their mobile phone. The portal generally has a user-friendly interface and allows employees to:

    • View their salaries, benefits, 401K and taxes,
    • Update their employment and contact details,
    • Enter time and attendance,
    • Submit expense and reimbursement forms, and
    • Request paid time off and sick leave.

    Managers can also approve and decline employee time off requests without your intervention.

    In the end, your employees will be able to answer many of their own questions at their own convenience and you’ll have to do less data entry, giving you back valuable time to spend on more meaningful activities.

    4. Reduce business errors with automated processes and a central database

    You know how important it is to maintain accurate payroll and compliance records. Any mistake is not just a headache but also a potential lawsuit.

    HRMS automates these processes, so that you can worry less about costly errors. It can calculate wages and salaries, deduct the correct amount of taxes and benefits, and print checks or execute direct deposits. It can also schedule reminders when compliance forms are due, require employees to digitally accept communications and deliver compliance training.

    In addition, the system will consolidate information into a central database. You won’t have to go searching through multiple filing cabinets, spreadsheets or emails for various details about a single employee. This not only saves you time and energy, but can also keep you organized and reduce errors in transferring information.

    5. Accelerate employee performance

    Employees are more productive when they feel that business objectives are aligned with their skill sets and accomplishments are properly rewarded. Yet it may not be clear to you how employees are doing in their roles and whether or not they are succeeding.

    HRMS solutions empower employees to take performance into their own hands. They can:

    • Monitor their own progress,
    • Seek help and make improvements between scheduled reviews, and
    • Develop their future goals.

    In response, managers can:

    • Quantify employee performance,
    • Provide more relevant feedback,
    • Select appropriate assignments,
    • Recognize achievements, and
    • Create succession plans to promote exceptional employees.

    Overall, everyone will have a better understanding of how employees are doing at their jobs. Managers can acknowledge progress and employees will have a clearer path going forward.

    6. Understand why employees leave

    When an employee leaves, you conduct an exit interview to understand why. The information you get, however, may not always be accurate. Perhaps there are strong emotions surrounding the departure or the employee doesn’t feel comfortable being honest in person.

    HRMS solutions can communicate with employees even after they leave. Because they’ve had time to understand their reasoning and now have the space to be direct, their insight can be valuable. This information can be combined with other metrics previously collected by the software such as demographics, performance, promotion wait time and compensation ratio to create a more holistic analysis of employee turnover.

    Fully examining why an employee leaves is important because it helps to develop a strategy for reducing turnover in the future. Without proper data, you’re left to wonder if your assessments are accurate.

    7. Support your decisions with evidence

    Businesses are increasingly looking to HR for more data-driven initiatives and strategies. Whether its recruiting more efficiently, increasing engagement or reducing turnover, senior management wants your decisions to be backed up with quantifiable metrics.

    HRMS not only records information but can also generate reports and analyze real-time key performance indicators, such as duration-in-position or time-to-achieve goals. This data can help you develop evidence-based strategies that are more likely to get buy-in from senior management.

    Some HRMS solutions even offer predictive analytics that can give you more certainty in your workforce decisions and insights for future recruitment and retention strategies.

    Still undecided on HRMS?

    With a self-service portal, automated processes and a central database, HRMS solutions can reduce the amount of time you spend on labor-intensive tasks and transform your HR department.

    You’ll now be free to focus on data-driven strategy and higher-level initiatives that will ultimately benefit your greatest resource–your employees.

    If you’re in the market for an HRMS solution, it’s important to do more research on implementation, cost, integration and training. For more info, here’s our definitive guide to HRMS.

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  • 7 WAYS HRMS CAN TRANSFORM HOW YOUR HR DEPARTMENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: central database, Hiring & Recruiting, HRMS, Management, onboarding, Pay and Benefits, Payroll, Performance Managemnt, Retention & Turnover, self-service portal, streamline, Talent Management, turnover

    A typical day in HR is… anything but typical. Whether you’re dealing with an employee suddenly leaving or your CEO demanding results, you’re constantly on the move and putting out new fires.

    You’re busy, to say the least.

    And on top of it all, you still have to answer questions about payroll and keep up with compliance reporting. That leaves little room for higher-level responsibilities like scouting for new talent or developing strategies to motivate employees.

    No one needs to tell you that your time and energy are valuable. And your day shouldn’t be consumed with administrative or routine tasks. Whether you’re doing everything on pen and paper or using specialized software for recruiting or training, it’s time to consider a change.

    If you haven’t heard about HRMS, now is the time to check out the technology that can streamline HR and help you take back your day.

    What is HRMS?

    A human resource management system (HRMS) integrates all of the core and strategic HR functions into one solution, improves recruiting, offers a self-service portal, automates data entry and administrative processes, streamlines information in a central database, reduces payroll and compliance errors, and facilitates data-driven strategies.

    How is HRMS different from HRIS and HCM?

    HRMS, HRIS and HCM are various acronyms used for comprehensive HR technology. It’s easy to get confused, because these terms are often used inconsistently and interchangeably. That said, it’s still a good idea to know how they are generally defined. Here’s a breakdown of which modules are included in each one:

    • Human resource information system (HRIS) – applicant tracking, employee self-service portal, central database, analytics, training, compensation and benefits
    • Human capital management (HCM) ­– HRIS modules, plus onboarding and talent management
    • Human resource management system (HRMS) – HCM modules, plus payroll, time and attendance, and performance tracking

    HRMS has the most modules of any HR technology, but typically has fewer customizations and advanced features compared to specialized software that focuses on an individual module. What makes HRMS preferable, however, is that it’s an integrated system that can follow employees end-to-end from recruiting to exit interviews.

    Consider these seven ways that HRMS can transform your HR department.

    1. Manage the hiring process more efficiently

    We’ve previously written about the insights that applicant tracking systems (ATS) can provide, including:

    • Finding and solving hiring bottlenecks
    • Discovering which hiring managers need help
    • Tracking your hiring team’s efficiency and effectiveness
    • Determining your best sources for hires

    An HRMS solution won’t have as many specialized features as a dedicated ATS software, but it will have the benefit of retaining applicant information if they are hired and onboarded. You’ll also be able to analyze this data and generate reports on the types of candidates that ultimately become successful employees.

    2. Engage employees with onboarding and training

    Once you’ve hired the right candidate, it will be important you to keep them engaged from the beginning. Employees that go through a structured onboarding program are 58% more likely to stay with an organization after three years.

    With HRMS, onboarding can start even before the new employee reaches the office. Employees can sign administrative documents electronically, catch up on company news and business goals, and join virtual social networks of colleagues. On their first day, they’ll have more time to tour the facility, set up their equipment and hit the ground running.

    HRMS solutions can also boost engagement through continuing education. For example, millennial employees ranked training and development as the most important benefit of working for a company, higher than cash bonuses, free health care and a pension.

    Small businesses may find hiring speakers or holding physical classes too expensive. HRMS offers a cost-effective alternative with e-learning modules to help employees improve their skills and performance at their own pace.

    This type of professional development not only promotes employee engagement, but also prepares future leaders within your company who might otherwise leave.

    3. Save time with a self-service portal

    Employees often have specific questions about their salaries, benefits and time off. Answering these vital yet routine questions, however, can take up a huge chunk of your day.

    With a self-service portal, employees can access their information any time, from a remote site or on their mobile phone. The portal generally has a user-friendly interface and allows employees to:

    • View their salaries, benefits, 401K and taxes,
    • Update their employment and contact details,
    • Enter time and attendance,
    • Submit expense and reimbursement forms, and
    • Request paid time off and sick leave.

    Managers can also approve and decline employee time off requests without your intervention.

    In the end, your employees will be able to answer many of their own questions at their own convenience and you’ll have to do less data entry, giving you back valuable time to spend on more meaningful activities.

    4. Reduce business errors with automated processes and a central database

    You know how important it is to maintain accurate payroll and compliance records. Any mistake is not just a headache but also a potential lawsuit.

    HRMS automates these processes, so that you can worry less about costly errors. It can calculate wages and salaries, deduct the correct amount of taxes and benefits, and print checks or execute direct deposits. It can also schedule reminders when compliance forms are due, require employees to digitally accept communications and deliver compliance training.

    In addition, the system will consolidate information into a central database. You won’t have to go searching through multiple filing cabinets, spreadsheets or emails for various details about a single employee. This not only saves you time and energy, but can also keep you organized and reduce errors in transferring information.

    5. Accelerate employee performance

    Employees are more productive when they feel that business objectives are aligned with their skill sets and accomplishments are properly rewarded. Yet it may not be clear to you how employees are doing in their roles and whether or not they are succeeding.

    HRMS solutions empower employees to take performance into their own hands. They can:

    • Monitor their own progress,
    • Seek help and make improvements between scheduled reviews, and
    • Develop their future goals.

    In response, managers can:

    • Quantify employee performance,
    • Provide more relevant feedback,
    • Select appropriate assignments,
    • Recognize achievements, and
    • Create succession plans to promote exceptional employees.

    Overall, everyone will have a better understanding of how employees are doing at their jobs. Managers can acknowledge progress and employees will have a clearer path going forward.

    6. Understand why employees leave

    When an employee leaves, you conduct an exit interview to understand why. The information you get, however, may not always be accurate. Perhaps there are strong emotions surrounding the departure or the employee doesn’t feel comfortable being honest in person.

    HRMS solutions can communicate with employees even after they leave. Because they’ve had time to understand their reasoning and now have the space to be direct, their insight can be valuable. This information can be combined with other metrics previously collected by the software such as demographics, performance, promotion wait time and compensation ratio to create a more holistic analysis of employee turnover.

    Fully examining why an employee leaves is important because it helps to develop a strategy for reducing turnover in the future. Without proper data, you’re left to wonder if your assessments are accurate.

    7. Support your decisions with evidence

    Businesses are increasingly looking to HR for more data-driven initiatives and strategies. Whether its recruiting more efficiently, increasing engagement or reducing turnover, senior management wants your decisions to be backed up with quantifiable metrics.

    HRMS not only records information but can also generate reports and analyze real-time key performance indicators, such as duration-in-position or time-to-achieve goals. This data can help you develop evidence-based strategies that are more likely to get buy-in from senior management.

    Some HRMS solutions even offer predictive analytics that can give you more certainty in your workforce decisions and insights for future recruitment and retention strategies.

    Still undecided on HRMS?

    With a self-service portal, automated processes and a central database, HRMS solutions can reduce the amount of time you spend on labor-intensive tasks and transform your HR department.

    You’ll now be free to focus on data-driven strategy and higher-level initiatives that will ultimately benefit your greatest resource–your employees.

    If you’re in the market for an HRMS solution, it’s important to do more research on implementation, cost, integration and training. For more info, here’s our definitive guide to HRMS.

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  • APPLICANTS GETTING MORE AGGRESSIVE ABOUT NEGOTIATING SALARIES: REPORT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Hiring & Recruiting, hiring trends, job applicants, negotiations, salary negotiations

    Another sign of a tightening job market: More than half of professionals (55%) participating in a recent survey said they tried to negotiate a higher salary with their last employment offer.

    That’s a 16-point jump from a similar survey conducted last year, according to research from the staffing firm Robert Half.

    And it looks as though employers are ready to deal with the new dynamic. In a separate survey:

    • 70% of senior managers said they expect some back-and-forth on salary, and
    • about six in 10 (62%) are more open to negotiating compensation than they were a year ago.

    Houston, LA, Miami lead the way

    Other key results of the Robert Half research:

    • 68% of male employees tried to negotiate pay vs. 45% of women.
    • More professionals ages 18 to 34 (65%) asked for higher compensation compared to those ages 35 to 54 (55%) and 55 and older (38%).
    • Boston (80%), Denver and Washington, DC (78% each) have the most managers who said they expect job seekers to negotiate salary.
    • Houston (73%), Los Angeles (72%) and Miami (71%) have the largest number of executives more willing to discuss pay than they were a year ago.
    • Managers in Washington, DC (71%), Houston and Los Angeles (70% each) are most open to negotiating nonmonetary perks and benefits compared to last year.

    What’s the cause of the increased confidence in employees’ leverage?

    Experts point to two factors:

    1. increased competition for highly skilled workers
    2. more access to salary info via the Internet

    Bottom line: In order to remain competitive, companies are going to have to be vigilant about monitoring compensation trends.

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  • IBM’S JOB APPLICATION GAFFE HOLDS AN IMPORTANT LESSON FOR ALL EMPLOYERS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: hiring, Hiring & Recruiting, In this week's e-newsletter, Latest News & Views, recruiting, social media

    There’s an important lesson for organizations of all sizes in a recent embarrassment for one of the world’s best-known companies – check your job postings carefully before they go up on the internet!

    Questions about race and ethnicity are commonly included on U.S.-based company’s application forms to help companies track diversity and comply with affirmative action requirements. But an IBM application included terms that startled the applicant. The pull-down menu for the required field “Ethnic Group” displayed categories including “mullatto” and “yellow.”

    The applicant, who is an Asian-American, tweeted about his experience, and included a screen shot of the web application form, saying “@ibm applied for a job on your career site. Aren’t these ethnic group labels a little antiquated? To make matters worse, I couldn’t submit my application w/o selecting an option. I ended up selecting “Yellow” and “Coloured.”

    Lost in translation?

    IBM responded a day later by apologizing and saying the job posting had been copied and translated from similar postings intended for positions in other countries. The company said that the categories included on the posting are required by the governments in Brazil and South Africa for census and other uses.

    IBM replaced the questions from its application form to reflect U.S. standard terms including American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African-American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and White. The revised application also gives applicants the  the option to refuse to provide an ethnic identifier.

    Like other global companies, IBM must localize content to comply with a wider variety of regulations and cultural norms than most businesses when designing its job applications and other forms. But every organization can avoid a similar error – and, potentially, public embarrassment – by ensuring that all job postings and other public docs are reviewed carefully before they go live.

     

     

     

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