JOB POSTINGS

  • A JOB SEEKER’S ENVIRONMENT CAN KILL YOUR PIPELINE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advertising & Marketing, Candidate Engagement, candidate experience, Job Postings

    Job seekers are people. People get distracted. So, you have to ask yourself: “Are my recruitment marketing materials attracting and engaging job seekers”? To answer this question, understand the job seekers’ environment when searching for and applying to jobs.

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  • NEED TO RECRUIT MORE APPLICANTS? OFFER THEM A PRODUCT DISCOUNT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Advertising & Marketing, Candidate Engagement, candidate experience, Featured, Job Postings, Passive Candidates

    Many search for jobs because they seek more buying power, so why not offer qualified applicants a product discount to meet that interest? Yes, when you’re struggling to acquire talent in these low-unemployment times, application incentives can be a key motivator and differentiator. And for recruiting leaders who are trying to be more strategic, this approach has the added advantage of increasing the business impact of the recruiting function by bringing in more customers. If you are worried about increased costs, well-designed product/service discount application incentive will likely, over time, bring in enough sales revenue to more than offset any initial costs from the discount.

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  • ACLU SUES FACEBOOK FOR DISCRIMINATORY JOB ADS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: ACLU, Age Discrimination, discrimination, Discrimination & Harassment, eeoc, Facebook, Gender Discrimination, hiring, Hiring & Recruiting, job ads, Job Postings, Latest News & Views, Special Report

    Facebook is in hot water once again — this time, for job ads targeting exclusively men for roles such as police officers, truck drivers and sports store clerks. The ACLU lodged a complaint against the social media giant — as well as 10 employers that used Facebook to post ads — on behalf of three female job hunters and the Communications Workers of America.

    Civil rights violation?

    The complaint was filed with the EEOC and accuses Facebook of enabling discriminatory job postings.

    Specifically, companies used Facebook’s ad targeting features to exclude female candidates, and young and older men. Enhanced Roofing and Remodeling made its help wanted ad appear only to men 23 to 50 years old. The City of Greensboro, NC published an ad looking for police officers, but only men ages 25 to 35 could see it.

    But the ACLU is more focused on Facebook than these employers — after all, the social media giant is the one that allowed ads to be marketed and delivered in this way.

    “This type of targeting is as illegal now as it was in 1964 when the Civil Rights Act was passed,” a spokesperson for the ACLU said. “It also essentially acts as a recruiter connecting employers with prospective employees. In this context, it should be legally accountable for both creating and delivering these discriminatory ad campaigns.”

    This case is currently pending.

    Employer takeaway

    Facebook’s legal trouble emphasizes to employers how risky it is to target candidates based on any protected factors, such as gender or age.

    Even if you don’t target candidates in this way, it’s smart to review the language of your job postings. What does it say about experience levels? Does it say anything about preferring recent college grads? Wrongly worded job posts could be considered discriminatory.

     

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  • ACLU CHARGES FACEBOOK, 10 EMPLOYERS WITH MEN ONLY TARGETING

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), Featured, Hiring Discrimination, Job Postings, Sexual Discrimination

    One of the most powerful marketing features of sites like Facebook is the ability to target messages to specific groups. If you’re selling roofing and remodeling services in Silver Spring, Maryland, it makes sense to target your ads to homeowners in that area. But when Enhanced Roofing and Remodeling targeted its help wanted ad to men 23 to 50 years of age in the Silver Spring area, it left out women and older and younger men.

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  • COURT CONSIDERING IF EXPERIENCE LIMITS IN JOB POSTINGS ARE DISCRIMINATORY

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Age Discrimination Employment Act (ADEA), Featured, Job Postings, Legal, Compliance & Policies

    Employers should keep an eye on a case in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (based in Chicago) holding that the Age Discrimination in Employment Act covers both current employees and job applicants.

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  • EQUEST ADDS FACEBOOK TO ITS BLAST! NETWORK JOB DISTRIBUTION SERVICE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Facebook, Featured, google, Job Postings

    I don’t talk about eQuest much. It’s old. It’s boring. It does the dirty job of compliance and distribution while the recruitment world focuses on sexy tech like chatbots and messaging. It’s the low-risk stock that returns 5 percent year-in, year-out without fanfare.

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  • YOU TREAT EMPLOYEES LIKE FAMILY? UH-OH

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: culture, Featured, Job Postings, talent acquisition

    When I hear the word family, beyond the mental images of my own, I can’t help but think of the Cleavers, the Bradys, the Cunninghams, and the Huxtables.

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  • GET THE PERFECT CANDIDATE: 4 WAYS TO WRITE MORE EFFECTIVE JOB DESCRIPTIONS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: hiring, Hiring & Recruiting, In this week's e-newsletter, Job Descriptions, Job Postings, Latest News & Views, recruiting

    When it comes to job postings, the search process can be a little overwhelming. And when candidates are overwhelmed, it winds up hurting the hiring companies. 

    Applicants today are faced with creative, wordy descriptions of companies looking for motivated individuals who can “hit the ground running” in an “exciting and fast-paced environment.” The problem is, job-seekers don’t know what that means.

    These vague descriptions could apply to almost any job; the phrases could pop up in a posting for a senior-level finance position or a preschool teacher.

    And you might think a creative post will stand out and draw candidates in, but usually the opposite happens. Job-seekers want a clear picture of what their day-to-day will look like, not a good story.

    Suzanne Lucas, of Evil HR Lady, has four tips for writing clearer job descriptions that will help your company attract the right applicants.

    1. Pick a job title that makes sense

    Your company might use creative job titles, but the typical candidate is searching for very straightforward ones. If you call your IT Manager a Chief Technical Problem Solver, it could not only confuse a candidate, but they could miss the posting altogether. Use a job title that would make sense to everyone.

    2. Paint an accurate picture of the day-to-day duties

    A lot of job postings focus on what the candidate will have to produce, but not what’s involved in producing it. Job-seekers want to know what the end goal is, but they also want to know what their day-to-day will look like while working toward that goal.

    For example, the end product of creating a monthly sales report could mean very different things for someone’s daily tasks. This project could involve one person sitting down and organizing data, or it could mean multiple team members working to prepare a big presentation. An introvert who likes to work alone would enjoy the first method and absolutely hate the second one. Including the day-to-day as well as the end goals will ensure you get applicants who fully understand what is expected of them.

    3. Describe what the perks look like

    Many descriptions have generic statements like “flexible schedules” and “great benefits.” But what do these mean? And what specific jobs do they apply to?

    Most roles at the company may be eligible for flexible hours, but if the position you’re posting about requires someone to have rigid hours, don’t advertise flexible schedules as a company perk. If a certain benefit doesn’t apply to every position, don’t talk about it.

    And even if flexible hours do apply to the position, are there any exceptions? Is there a busy season where the employee will have set hours? Let them know.

    4. Don’t forget about the legal side

    Make sure your job description complies with any federal or local laws. Be careful with any wording that could seem discriminatory. If you say you’re looking for someone “young and energetic,” that could be considered discrimination against older applicants.

    Include all essential job functions, especially if there are physical tasks, like lifting or climbing. This is important for ADA purposes — if a job function isn’t listed in the description, you’ll have a hard time arguing that it’s essential.

    And remember, honesty is key. You don’t want to oversell the role in a way that deceives the
    job-seeker. Let them know exactly what they’ll be doing. This way, you can attract people who will truly do well in the role.

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  • ONLY HARDWORKERS WITH A BMI UNDER 25 MAY READ THIS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: culture, Featured, HR Insights, Job Descriptions, Job Postings, leadership, Performance & Personality, Talent Management

    • No overtime claim.
    • Do whatever your manager asks you to do.
    • Report to Manager
    • STRICTLY FOR HARDWORKING PROGRAMMER ONLY !!!!!! If you are not please do not apply for this job! [bold and uppercase]

    This, believe it or not, was a job ad posted at the website jobstreet.com based in Malaysia.

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  • MAKE YOUR NEXT JOB AD A GAME

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, Job Descriptions, Job Postings, recruiting, talent acquisition

    You can create a job ad in many different media. Traditional job advertisements were text. An alternative approach is to lead with an image (there is a whole world of job advertising via Instagram). Then there’s video (companies like Sparc are creating innovative tools for this) and finally, the time-tested medium of sound (radio ads remain effective).

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