MANAGEMENT

  • DEVELOPING A CBD OIL POLICY? IT GETS COMPLICATED …

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Employment Law, Management

    Just when you thought you had a handle on how your company policies align with laws on medical marijuana, along comes CBD oil.

    Cannabidiol, or CBD, comes from either the marijuana plant or the hemp plant. Made available to consumers by the 2018 Farm Bill, which allows for production and sale of CBD products.

    CBD is advertised as an
    anti-convulsent, anti-diabetic and anti-psychotic, as well as an aid for pain
    relief, anxiety, depression and sleep.

    As a result, the market is booming for CBD products in oil form, vapors, beverages (e.g., coffee K-Cups) and infused edibles (chocolates and gummies).

    CBD is not psychoactive, so employees are generally not at risk of getting intoxicated or impaired with use. It can, however, show up on a drug test as marijuana. That’s where your workplace policies come in.

    The CBD rub

    CBD isn’t regulated by the FDA,
    although some states, like Texas and Georgia, are starting to legalize and
    regulate it. In most of the U.S., your employees don’t really know what they’re
    ingesting with CBD products.

    Furthermore, pure CBD oil won’t report a positive result for marijuana in a drug test because tests typically look for tetrahydrocannabinols (THC) levels that are too low to be detected in pure CBD.

    But some of these unregulated products
    that tout themselves as “THC-free” or “CBD pure” have been tested to have THC.

    That’s why CBD presents the same challenges to employers as medical marijuana, as indicated on JD Supra:

    •   Do job
    applicants know what’s in their CBD product?
    And what impact, if any, does
    the CBD use have on their employment?

    •   What if a worker gets a positive drug test result? Even if an employee presents you with a “CBD pure” product as proof, how will you know what really caused the positive result? Are they also using recreational marijuana or unknowingly using CBD spiked with THC?

    What to do

    Before taking action against CBD users, here are some guidelines when developing a CBD oil company policy:

    •   Consider
    revising policies to address CBD use.
    Employers in states with medical
    marijuana laws in place may have a duty to accommodate the underlying condition
    prompting CBD use.

    •   Train managers. They’ll need to know how to address situations where an employee defends a hot test by using CBD.

    Finally, in this evolving landscape,
    review the laws of your state, work with employment counsel and prepare to be
    flexible until more CBD rules and regs are in place.

    The post Developing a CBD oil policy? It gets complicated … appeared first on HR Morning.

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  • BOOST EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT WITH THESE KEY PEOPLE SKILLS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Management, Performance Managemnt, Rewards and Recognition, Special Report

    With all the talk about “employee engagement,” it’s only fair to ask, “Can I really get all the people in my organization to give their best – every day?”

    The short answer is probably not “all.” But with the right amount of effort you can get “most” of them to give their best … most of the time. And that’s a lot better than where most companies are right now.

    Boiled down to its simplest parts, employee engagement is about connecting with employees and getting them focused. It’s requires an on-going and consistent effort by managers to bring out the best in people.

    Employee engagement takes practice

    You don’t need to be good friends with every employee – but it does help to build cordial relationships. That makes working with people more productive and cohesive.

    People get more engaged in their work then the work means something to them, when they understand their role in the organization, and can see and appreciate the results of their own accomplishments.

    Here are some “hands on” ways leaders can work to improve interactions and create a deeper connection with employees and colleagues:

    • Make it personal. Use people’s names when talking to them – from the janitor to the CEO. Even better, use the names of their significant others – spouses, kids, parents – when possible.
    • Say more than hello. Sometimes it’s necessary to cut to the chase and get to the business at hand – a project, deadline, important question, etc. But in other circumstances, there’s time to show interest in employees’ and colleagues’ lives. Instead of a generic “How are you?” ask about something that affects them.
    • Talk about their interests. People surround themselves with hints of what interests them outside of work (for instance, sports ticket stubs, photos of beach trips, logo T-shirts from local events, race medals, certificates of appreciation from philanthropic groups, etc.). Look for those hints and ask about them. Once you know a little about what they do outside work, you have a starter for other conversations: “How did your son’s soccer game turn out?” “Where did you volunteer this weekend?” “Planning any vacations?”
    • Show appreciation. Avoid waiting for the end of a project or annual reviews to thank employees and coworkers for their contributions. And it’s OK to say thanks for the little things they bring to the table – a good sense of humor, a sharp eye for errors, an impeccable work station, a positive attitude.
    • Make others feel important. Feeling important is slightly different than feeling appreciated. Employees need to know they’re relevant. Let them know you recognize their contributions by referring to past successes when you talk to them personally and to others in meetings. Explain why their work was important.
    • Recognize emotions. Work and life are roller coasters of emotions. Leaders don’t have to react to every peak and valley, but they’ll want to address the highs and lows they see. For instance, “You seem frustrated and anxious lately. Is something wrong that I can help with?” Or, “I can sense you’re very excited and proud. You deserve to be.”

    Building morale

    The best morale exists when you never hear the word mentioned. If you have employees, you’ll have morale problems. No matter how thorough a company’s hiring process is, at some point leaders will have to handle morale issues because employees get stressed, are overworked and deal with difficult people.

    The good news: Most of the time, employees won’t be down if their managers build and maintain morale. To stay ahead of morale issues:

    • Communicate. Employees left in the dark will become fearful and anxious and likely make up negative news to fill the gap. This can be avoided by regularly reporting information, changes and company news.
    • Listen. While sharing information is a must, employees must also be heard. Give them different options to share their concerns and ideas. Offer the floor at department meetings, have regular one-on-one meetings, put up a suggestion box or anonymous e-mail account for submissions, invite executives to come in and listen, etc.
    • Appreciate. People who aren’t recognized for their contributions may assume they’re not doing well. Leaders should take the time to thank employees for their everyday efforts that keep the operations running smoothly. In addition, extra effort should be recognized and rewarded.
    • Be fair. Nothing hurts morale like unfair treatment. Leaders can’t turn their backs on poor performances, and they can’t play favorites. It’s best to document what’s done in response to good and bad behaviors so leaders can do the exact same thing when the situation arises again – and have a record of it.
    • Provide opportunities to grow. Growth is often equated with moving up the career ladder. But it doesn’t have to be. Many employees are motivated by learning and creating a larger role for themselves. So if people can’t move up a career ladder (because there aren’t positions available), encourage them to learn more about the company, industry or business through in-house or outside training. Or give them opportunities to grow socially by allowing them time to volunteer.
    • Create a friendly environment. Research shows people who have friends at work are more motivated and loyal to their employer. While this can’t be forced, opportunities to build friendships can be provided through potluck lunches, team-building activities and requesting staff to help in the recruiting process.
    • Paint the picture. Employees who know their purpose have higher morale than those who are “just doing the job.” Regularly explain to employees how their roles fit into the company’s mission and how they affect the department and the company.

    Praise what you want to see repeated

    Handing out recognition takes a little more skill than just saying “Good job” and giving a pat on the back, though that’s a good start.

    Giving recognition well is a skill all leaders could improve upon to keep their employees encouraged and productive.

    Here are five guidelines for recognizing good work:

    1. Make it a policy, not a perk. Set rules for different types of recognition. For instance, recognize people for tenure and meeting goals – things everyone can accomplish.
    2. Stay small. Handshakes and sincere appreciation are always welcome (especially since 65% of employees say they haven’t been recognized in the past year, according to a Gallup Poll). Leaders need to look their employees in the eye, thank them for specific work and explain why it made a difference.
    3. Add some fanfare. Recognize people at meetings when others can congratulate them.
    4. Include the team. In addition to praising individuals, recognize a whole group for coming through during an unexpected hard time, meeting a goal, working together, etc.
    5. Make it personal. When recognizing employees, match the reward and praise to the person. One person may like a quiet thank-you and a gift card to a favorite store. Someone else might thrive on applause and a certificate given at a group lunch. Find out what people like and cater to them when possible.

     

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  • MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES TO HIGHER PERFORMANCE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Management, Performance Managemnt, Retention & Turnover, Talent Management

    Building and sustaining an energized workforce that takes initiative requires creating an inspiring atmosphere.

    Some of the key features of such a workplace are:

    • A creative work environment where employees are able to express themselves openly.
    • A work environment not stifled by unnecessary process and policy hurdles.
    • A challenging and constructive work environment featuring constant feedback.
    • Leadership that listens and responds to employees.
    • A collaborative and cross-functional workforce where diversity is cherished.

    Employees recognize the difference between empty slogans and real commitment and will respond to an organization that walks the walk in creating a great place to work.

    Happiness equals productivity

    A recent study found that employees who are happy are 12 percent more productive than those who aren’t.

    Whether or not the specific percentage is totally accurate, we can all confirm the general point from our own work experiences.

    Happy employees get to work on time, work hard, and take responsibility.

    So how to keep a happy workplace? Here’s some ideas

    • Make humor part of the agenda – work is stressful. Find ways to lighten things up occasionally
    • Within the constraints of your particular process, don’t insist on rigid schedules. Give employees some control over how they use their time during the day.
    • Respect, and encourage respect for, differences
    • Fewer managers and official leaders
    • Make fitness and physical activity part of a normal day
    • Create a bright atmosphere and encourage interaction

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  • REWARDS MATTER: 4 GREAT WAYS TO RECOGNIZE EMPLOYEES

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Management, morale, productivity, Rewards and Recognition, Special Report

    Rewards matter.

    Sure, salary and benefits are key factors, too. But for any good employee worth having on your payroll, being recognized for their efforts is  as important to them as their paycheck – with the added bonus that a well-planned employee recognition program boosts retention.

    Of course, in most places there’s just not a lot of extra money for bonuses, expensive gifts or over-the-top employee recognition celebrations.

    Still, you need to do something to keep employees engaged or productivity will eventually slip – and that will affect your organization’s bottom line.

    Get Creative

    To do this employee rewards and recognition effectively, the best companies try to get creative.

    There are a lot of very effective ways to recognize employees without your CFO blowing a gasket.

    It’s not the size or the cost of the gesture that matters. It’s the thought behind it. Employees know the difference, and they’ll feel more valued if the praise is meaningful and truly relates to their day-to-day work, that is, if it relates to what they actually DO.

    For example, if they are Employee of the Month because customers won’t stop raving about them, you need to say THAT, and say what the customers said, too!

    That kind of recognition is worth its weight in gold.

    Are 42% of your employees looking to leave?

    Many employees leave their companies not because of small salaries or huge workloads, but because they aren’t recognized or rewarded.

    One popular poll on employee recognition found 42% of respondents are actively looking for new jobs, and many of them are leaving because of a lack of recognition.

    Out of these dissatisfied workers:

    • Over half (56%) don’t feel appreciated at their current job
    • Nearly three in five (59%) are dissatisfied with the lack of employee recognition at their companies
    • 37% feel that employees at their company aren’t rewarded for job performance, and
    • Close to half (45%) don’t feel their job culture is a positive one.

    From this, it’s clear: Recognizing good people is important to employee recruitment and retention.

    Yet, in spite of these finding, it’s worth noting that, in the same study, three of four managers erroneously reported back that their workers’ satisfaction was high.

    Hmmmmm, swing and a miss.

    So, if you are one of those folks who believe employees want to feel valued; that they want their companies to recognize their talent; that management can make the difference when it comes to employee retention; and that you can do a good job of that without breaking the bank, here’s help.

    Here is a breakdown of some of the most popular – and unique – ways to recognize employees, along with examples of how those rewards have improved morale and productivity in the workplace.

    Everyone loves flexible scheduling

    What’s the No. 1 perk that employees say they would love to see at their jobs: A flexible schedule.

    In the CareerBuilder survey, nearly 60% of workers said this would convince them to stick around at their jobs. Having a flexible schedule is so important to workers that many would take a pay cut in exchange for one.

    Flex scheduling can take many different forms, such as offering later arrival times for parents so they can take their children to school, or earlier departures so they can pick them up in the afternoon. Another option is allowing employees to structure their work week so it can be completed in four days instead of the standard five.

    Or, one of the more popular options is allowing employees to work from home on occasion. Employees appreciate this perk because it gives them better work-life balance, which relieves some of their stress. And a less stressed employee is a more productive one.

    As long as people can produce good results working from home, this is a great way to reward them for what they do. It’s worked wonders for a lot of companies.

    Making flex time work

    Flex time is best given to employees who’ve already demonstrated proven results. Managers know these workers don’t need constant supervision to get their work done, so they can trust them not to abuse this privilege.

    For the best people, allowing them to work from home occasionally will be appreciated. Many people thrive when working from home, citing fewer distractions and less stress than they experience in an office setting.

    Plus, it’s a key factor in achieving work-life balance, which most employees value highly in today’s world.

    Besides the obvious reward that comes from flex-time, that is, achieving a better work-life balance, putting this trust in employees is its own reward.

    Most rise to the occasion so the trust isn’t broken, and produce better work than they normally would on a typical 9-to-5 schedule.

    Allowing employees a flexible work schedule, with the ability to work from home if necessary, is a reward that’ll pay off in dividends.

    And having an established protocol for them to follow only makes this easier to stick with.

    When considering flex-time arrangements, it’s best to start by phasing the program in gradually, starting with a handful of high-performing employees.

    Tip: Managers should keep close tabs on employees’ performance and productivity in the beginning, so they know how well the arrangement works.

    Paid Time Off

    Providing extra paid days off is another perk that makes a difference in retention and serves as an excellent reward.

    This is a particularly great motivator for a job well done. If employees had to work hard to hit a tight deadline, they’ll really be happy for a bonus day of vacation or personal time.

    Another option for providing time off: Implement “half-day Fridays” where employees who meet certain performance objectives can get a jump-start on the weekend.

    Try giving employees extra time off right before a paid holiday so they’ll be able to extend their time away from the office and indulge in a little more relaxation.

    It’s a small token of appreciation that costs nothing – and it’s something employees appreciate and will value.

    Unlimited vacation time

    Some companies have gone even further in allowing their employees to have as much time off from work as they feel is necessary.

    How?

    They’ve implemented unlimited vacation policies. These policies are exactly what they sound like: Instead of having a set number of vacation days, workers are given virtually free rein to take as much vacation time as they feel they need.

    A policy of this nature is a drastic change from the normal approach toward vacation time and is likely to met by some C-levels folks with a big gulp.

    But it could be an effective way to reward people for completion of certain projects or objectives.

    Most companies who have implemented the policy have reported little abuse of the system. In fact, it’s been a real motivator for their people.

    One example is LRN, a New York-based company, that implemented an unlimited vacation policy for three years. When the policy first began, the company was very proactive about informing employees of the change and rolled it out gradually to allow workers to use their accrued vacation time.

    Results have been largely positive, with employees actually being more considerate of how their time away from the office will affect the company’s operations.

    Vacation abuse is rare; in fact, they average about three weeks a year per employee – the same as they were before the changes were implemented.

    The Wall Street Journal offered these three tips for companies that are considering such a vacation policy:

    1. Remove any unnecessary regulations. Before implementing an unlimited vacation policy, cut out any red tape adding an extra bureaucratic level to the process. Make it as simple as possible.
    2. Trust employees. Managers who have faith their workers will make good decisions when planning their vacations tend to have employees who live up to those expectations.
    3. Be clear about expectations. Make sure employees are fully aware that unlimited vacation time doesn’t mean they don’t have to fulfill their work responsibilities before taking time off. Communicate key goals and priorities to them so they know what must be handled before they leave.

    Sabbaticals

    Managers that really want to make their incentive programs stand out can go the extra mile and offer top performers the chance to go on a sabbatical.

    The difference between a sabbatical and regular time off: Sabbaticals can be used for professional development purposes.

    One company in Dallas, The Marketing Arm, has created a unique program for its long-term employees that incorporates sabbaticals as a reward for company loyalty.

    An employee who’s worked at the company for seven years gets a seven-day sabbatical, and employees who’ve logged 15 years at the company get 15 days.

    Workers get a small stipend for the sabbatical, and they must take all the time off at once. Many have used the time to develop a skill they’ve always wanted to learn more about or help others less fortunate.

    Offering this perk has been a real boon for The Marketing Arm: The company’s been able to recruit and retain top talent because of these sabbaticals.

    Managers may wish to offer this as a reward for particularly notable high performers, with the inclusion of a stipend being wholly optional.

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  • 7 WAYS HRMS CAN TRANSFORM YOUR HR DEPARTMENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: central database, Hiring & Recruiting, HRMS, Management, onboarding, Pay and Benefits, Payroll, Performance Managemnt, Retention & Turnover, self-service portal, streamline, Talent Management, turnover

    A typical day in HR is… anything but typical. Whether you’re dealing with an employee suddenly leaving or your CEO demanding results, you’re constantly on the move and putting out new fires.

    You’re busy, to say the least.

    And on top of it all, you still have to answer questions about payroll and keep up with compliance reporting. That leaves little room for higher-level responsibilities like scouting for new talent or developing strategies to motivate employees.

    No one needs to tell you that your time and energy are valuable. And your day shouldn’t be consumed with administrative or routine tasks. Whether you’re doing everything on pen and paper or using specialized software for recruiting or training, it’s time to consider a change.

    If you haven’t heard about HRMS, now is the time to check out the technology that can streamline HR and help you take back your day.

    What is HRMS?

    A human resource management system (HRMS) integrates all of the core and strategic HR functions into one solution, improves recruiting, offers a self-service portal, automates data entry and administrative processes, streamlines information in a central database, reduces payroll and compliance errors, and facilitates data-driven strategies.

    How is HRMS different from HRIS and HCM?

    HRMS, HRIS and HCM are various acronyms used for comprehensive HR technology. It’s easy to get confused, because these terms are often used inconsistently and interchangeably. That said, it’s still a good idea to know how they are generally defined. Here’s a breakdown of which modules are included in each one:

    • Human resource information system (HRIS) – applicant tracking, employee self-service portal, central database, analytics, training, compensation and benefits
    • Human capital management (HCM) ­– HRIS modules, plus onboarding and talent management
    • Human resource management system (HRMS) – HCM modules, plus payroll, time and attendance, and performance tracking

    HRMS has the most modules of any HR technology, but typically has fewer customizations and advanced features compared to specialized software that focuses on an individual module. What makes HRMS preferable, however, is that it’s an integrated system that can follow employees end-to-end from recruiting to exit interviews.

    Consider these seven ways that HRMS can transform your HR department.

    1. Manage the hiring process more efficiently

    We’ve previously written about the insights that applicant tracking systems (ATS) can provide, including:

    • Finding and solving hiring bottlenecks
    • Discovering which hiring managers need help
    • Tracking your hiring team’s efficiency and effectiveness
    • Determining your best sources for hires

    An HRMS solution won’t have as many specialized features as a dedicated ATS software, but it will have the benefit of retaining applicant information if they are hired and onboarded. You’ll also be able to analyze this data and generate reports on the types of candidates that ultimately become successful employees.

    2. Engage employees with onboarding and training

    Once you’ve hired the right candidate, it will be important for you to keep them engaged from the beginning. Employees that go through a structured onboarding program are 58% more likely to stay with an organization after three years.

    With HRMS, onboarding can start even before the new employee reaches the office. Employees can sign administrative documents electronically, catch up on company news and business goals, and join virtual social networks of colleagues. On their first day, they’ll have more time to tour the facility, set up their equipment and hit the ground running.

    HRMS solutions can also boost engagement through continuing education. For example, millennial employees ranked training and development as the most important benefit of working for a company, higher than cash bonuses, free health care and a pension.

    Small businesses may find hiring speakers or holding physical classes too expensive. HRMS offers a cost-effective alternative with e-learning modules to help employees improve their skills and performance at their own pace.

    This type of professional development not only promotes employee engagement, but also prepares future leaders within your company who might otherwise leave.

    3. Save time with a self-service portal

    Employees often have specific questions about their salaries, benefits and time off. Answering these vital yet routine questions, however, can take up a huge chunk of your day.

    With a self-service portal, employees can access their information any time, from a remote site or on their mobile phone. The portal generally has a user-friendly interface and allows employees to:

    • View their salaries, benefits, 401K and taxes,
    • Update their employment and contact details,
    • Enter time and attendance,
    • Submit expense and reimbursement forms, and
    • Request paid time off and sick leave.

    Managers can also approve and decline employee time off requests without your intervention.

    In the end, your employees will be able to answer many of their own questions at their own convenience and you’ll have to do less data entry, giving you back valuable time to spend on more meaningful activities.

    4. Reduce business errors with automated processes and a central database

    You know how important it is to maintain accurate payroll and compliance records. Any mistake is not just a headache but also a potential lawsuit.

    HRMS automates these processes, so that you can worry less about costly errors. It can calculate wages and salaries, deduct the correct amount of taxes and benefits, and print checks or execute direct deposits. It can also schedule reminders when compliance forms are due, require employees to digitally accept communications and deliver compliance training.

    In addition, the system will consolidate information into a central database. You won’t have to go searching through multiple filing cabinets, spreadsheets or emails for various details about a single employee. This not only saves you time and energy, but can also keep you organized and reduce errors in transferring information.

    5. Accelerate employee performance

    Employees are more productive when they feel that business objectives are aligned with their skill sets and accomplishments are properly rewarded. Yet it may not be clear to you how employees are doing in their roles and whether or not they are succeeding.

    HRMS solutions empower employees to take performance into their own hands. They can:

    • Monitor their own progress,
    • Seek help and make improvements between scheduled reviews, and
    • Develop their future goals.

    In response, managers can:

    • Quantify employee performance,
    • Provide more relevant feedback,
    • Select appropriate assignments,
    • Recognize achievements, and
    • Create succession plans to promote exceptional employees.

    Overall, everyone will have a better understanding of how employees are doing at their jobs. Managers can acknowledge progress and employees will have a clearer path going forward.

    6. Understand why employees leave

    When an employee leaves, you conduct an exit interview to understand why. The information you get, however, may not always be accurate. Perhaps there are strong emotions surrounding the departure or the employee doesn’t feel comfortable being honest in person.

    HRMS solutions can communicate with employees even after they leave. Because they’ve had time to understand their reasoning and now have the space to be direct, their insight can be valuable. This information can be combined with other metrics previously collected by the software such as demographics, performance, promotion wait time and compensation ratio to create a more holistic analysis of employee turnover.

    Fully examining why an employee leaves is important because it helps to develop a strategy for reducing turnover in the future. Without proper data, you’re left to wonder if your assessments are accurate.

    7. Support your decisions with evidence

    Businesses are increasingly looking to HR for more data-driven initiatives and strategies. Whether its recruiting more efficiently, increasing engagement or reducing turnover, senior management wants your decisions to be backed up with quantifiable metrics.

    HRMS not only records information but can also generate reports and analyze real-time key performance indicators, such as duration-in-position or time-to-achieve goals. This data can help you develop evidence-based strategies that are more likely to get buy-in from senior management.

    Some HRMS solutions even offer predictive analytics that can give you more certainty in your workforce decisions and insights for future recruitment and retention strategies.

    Still undecided on HRMS?

    With a self-service portal, automated processes and a central database, HRMS solutions can reduce the amount of time you spend on labor-intensive tasks and transform your HR department.

    You’ll now be free to focus on data-driven strategy and higher-level initiatives that will ultimately benefit your greatest resource–your employees.

    If you’re in the market for an HRMS solution, it’s important to do more research on implementation, cost, integration and training. For more info, here’s our definitive guide to HRMS.

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  • 7 WAYS HRMS CAN TRANSFORM HOW YOUR HR DEPARTMENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: central database, Hiring & Recruiting, HRMS, Management, onboarding, Pay and Benefits, Payroll, Performance Managemnt, Retention & Turnover, self-service portal, streamline, Talent Management, turnover

    A typical day in HR is… anything but typical. Whether you’re dealing with an employee suddenly leaving or your CEO demanding results, you’re constantly on the move and putting out new fires.

    You’re busy, to say the least.

    And on top of it all, you still have to answer questions about payroll and keep up with compliance reporting. That leaves little room for higher-level responsibilities like scouting for new talent or developing strategies to motivate employees.

    No one needs to tell you that your time and energy are valuable. And your day shouldn’t be consumed with administrative or routine tasks. Whether you’re doing everything on pen and paper or using specialized software for recruiting or training, it’s time to consider a change.

    If you haven’t heard about HRMS, now is the time to check out the technology that can streamline HR and help you take back your day.

    What is HRMS?

    A human resource management system (HRMS) integrates all of the core and strategic HR functions into one solution, improves recruiting, offers a self-service portal, automates data entry and administrative processes, streamlines information in a central database, reduces payroll and compliance errors, and facilitates data-driven strategies.

    How is HRMS different from HRIS and HCM?

    HRMS, HRIS and HCM are various acronyms used for comprehensive HR technology. It’s easy to get confused, because these terms are often used inconsistently and interchangeably. That said, it’s still a good idea to know how they are generally defined. Here’s a breakdown of which modules are included in each one:

    • Human resource information system (HRIS) – applicant tracking, employee self-service portal, central database, analytics, training, compensation and benefits
    • Human capital management (HCM) ­– HRIS modules, plus onboarding and talent management
    • Human resource management system (HRMS) – HCM modules, plus payroll, time and attendance, and performance tracking

    HRMS has the most modules of any HR technology, but typically has fewer customizations and advanced features compared to specialized software that focuses on an individual module. What makes HRMS preferable, however, is that it’s an integrated system that can follow employees end-to-end from recruiting to exit interviews.

    Consider these seven ways that HRMS can transform your HR department.

    1. Manage the hiring process more efficiently

    We’ve previously written about the insights that applicant tracking systems (ATS) can provide, including:

    • Finding and solving hiring bottlenecks
    • Discovering which hiring managers need help
    • Tracking your hiring team’s efficiency and effectiveness
    • Determining your best sources for hires

    An HRMS solution won’t have as many specialized features as a dedicated ATS software, but it will have the benefit of retaining applicant information if they are hired and onboarded. You’ll also be able to analyze this data and generate reports on the types of candidates that ultimately become successful employees.

    2. Engage employees with onboarding and training

    Once you’ve hired the right candidate, it will be important you to keep them engaged from the beginning. Employees that go through a structured onboarding program are 58% more likely to stay with an organization after three years.

    With HRMS, onboarding can start even before the new employee reaches the office. Employees can sign administrative documents electronically, catch up on company news and business goals, and join virtual social networks of colleagues. On their first day, they’ll have more time to tour the facility, set up their equipment and hit the ground running.

    HRMS solutions can also boost engagement through continuing education. For example, millennial employees ranked training and development as the most important benefit of working for a company, higher than cash bonuses, free health care and a pension.

    Small businesses may find hiring speakers or holding physical classes too expensive. HRMS offers a cost-effective alternative with e-learning modules to help employees improve their skills and performance at their own pace.

    This type of professional development not only promotes employee engagement, but also prepares future leaders within your company who might otherwise leave.

    3. Save time with a self-service portal

    Employees often have specific questions about their salaries, benefits and time off. Answering these vital yet routine questions, however, can take up a huge chunk of your day.

    With a self-service portal, employees can access their information any time, from a remote site or on their mobile phone. The portal generally has a user-friendly interface and allows employees to:

    • View their salaries, benefits, 401K and taxes,
    • Update their employment and contact details,
    • Enter time and attendance,
    • Submit expense and reimbursement forms, and
    • Request paid time off and sick leave.

    Managers can also approve and decline employee time off requests without your intervention.

    In the end, your employees will be able to answer many of their own questions at their own convenience and you’ll have to do less data entry, giving you back valuable time to spend on more meaningful activities.

    4. Reduce business errors with automated processes and a central database

    You know how important it is to maintain accurate payroll and compliance records. Any mistake is not just a headache but also a potential lawsuit.

    HRMS automates these processes, so that you can worry less about costly errors. It can calculate wages and salaries, deduct the correct amount of taxes and benefits, and print checks or execute direct deposits. It can also schedule reminders when compliance forms are due, require employees to digitally accept communications and deliver compliance training.

    In addition, the system will consolidate information into a central database. You won’t have to go searching through multiple filing cabinets, spreadsheets or emails for various details about a single employee. This not only saves you time and energy, but can also keep you organized and reduce errors in transferring information.

    5. Accelerate employee performance

    Employees are more productive when they feel that business objectives are aligned with their skill sets and accomplishments are properly rewarded. Yet it may not be clear to you how employees are doing in their roles and whether or not they are succeeding.

    HRMS solutions empower employees to take performance into their own hands. They can:

    • Monitor their own progress,
    • Seek help and make improvements between scheduled reviews, and
    • Develop their future goals.

    In response, managers can:

    • Quantify employee performance,
    • Provide more relevant feedback,
    • Select appropriate assignments,
    • Recognize achievements, and
    • Create succession plans to promote exceptional employees.

    Overall, everyone will have a better understanding of how employees are doing at their jobs. Managers can acknowledge progress and employees will have a clearer path going forward.

    6. Understand why employees leave

    When an employee leaves, you conduct an exit interview to understand why. The information you get, however, may not always be accurate. Perhaps there are strong emotions surrounding the departure or the employee doesn’t feel comfortable being honest in person.

    HRMS solutions can communicate with employees even after they leave. Because they’ve had time to understand their reasoning and now have the space to be direct, their insight can be valuable. This information can be combined with other metrics previously collected by the software such as demographics, performance, promotion wait time and compensation ratio to create a more holistic analysis of employee turnover.

    Fully examining why an employee leaves is important because it helps to develop a strategy for reducing turnover in the future. Without proper data, you’re left to wonder if your assessments are accurate.

    7. Support your decisions with evidence

    Businesses are increasingly looking to HR for more data-driven initiatives and strategies. Whether its recruiting more efficiently, increasing engagement or reducing turnover, senior management wants your decisions to be backed up with quantifiable metrics.

    HRMS not only records information but can also generate reports and analyze real-time key performance indicators, such as duration-in-position or time-to-achieve goals. This data can help you develop evidence-based strategies that are more likely to get buy-in from senior management.

    Some HRMS solutions even offer predictive analytics that can give you more certainty in your workforce decisions and insights for future recruitment and retention strategies.

    Still undecided on HRMS?

    With a self-service portal, automated processes and a central database, HRMS solutions can reduce the amount of time you spend on labor-intensive tasks and transform your HR department.

    You’ll now be free to focus on data-driven strategy and higher-level initiatives that will ultimately benefit your greatest resource–your employees.

    If you’re in the market for an HRMS solution, it’s important to do more research on implementation, cost, integration and training. For more info, here’s our definitive guide to HRMS.

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  • STARTING A CROSS-TRAINING PROGRAM

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: cross-training, Latest News & Views, Management, new skills, training

    As the job market tightens, many companies turn to formal cross-training programs to make sure they’re operating at top efficiency.

    Since not all workers will be excited about learning a new set of skills, the steps taken to prepare employees for a cross-training program go a long way toward making sure it’s a success.

    Here are some strategies employers can use to start laying the groundwork for a successful program.

    Ease into it

    When it comes to cross-training employees, the best bet is to take it one step at a time, one department at a time.

    Jumping into a mass training can cause a lot of unforeseen snags – not the least of which is a confused and intimidated workforce.

    Overcome fear of change

    Of course, sometimes the reason a message falls flat is because workers don’t want to hear it.

    Fear of change caused by a misunderstanding – like cross-training is a forerunner of downsizing – can sabotage even the most well-crafted training sessions.

    If workers don’t understand why cross-training is necessary, it can lead to a lot of ugly rumors circulating around the workplace.

    The more information workers have early on as to why the company is cross-training (e.g., to offer learning opportunities, prepare for summer vacations), the more comfortable they’ll feel with the new program.

    This way supervisors won’t have to worry about facing down a barrage of questions or skeptical looks, and instead will have a more open – and even eager – audience.

    Get supervisors’ input

    Frontline supervisors tend to have pretty good insight into what makes employees tick. Make it a point to get supervisors and team leaders to share some of that insight before the first cross-training session.

    Ask the top brass to sit in

    Nothing can hammer home the importance of cross-training like seeing a member of the company’s top brass sign off on it.

    So invite some of the C-level executives to sit in on any meetings announcing the new training program.

    It’ll show workers just how important having staff flexibility is to the company.

    Tip: If no one from the top brass can make it to a meeting, ask one of them if they’d be willing to send out a company-wide email voicing their support for the initiative. It won’t carry as much weight as actually seeing them in the room, but it’s definitely the next best thing.

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  • KEYS TO EFFECTIVE SUCCESSION PLANNING: TALENT MANAGEMENT SPECIAL REPORT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Management, Special Report, Succession Planning, succession plans, Talent Management

    Are changes in your market forcing a change in strategy that will demand new talent?

    Have one or more of your long-time stars started thinking about moving to a competitor or retiring?

    Or are you just trying to make sure the wheels keep turning for a few weeks or months if one of your top people gets sick or dies unexpectedly?

    Succession planning is a talent management must-do for organizations of all sizes, whether a global corporation, a small non-profit, a mid-sized college or a family business with a dozen employees.

    Long-term success depends on creating a plan for how you’ll keep your team moving forward when you lose a key player or encounter a skills gap that must be filled quickly.

    It brings focus to the process of identifying top performers, employees with strong potential and the people that you need to push hard or push out.

    For employees, the succession planning process translates into stretch opportunities that can help them learn new skills, advance their careers, increase their value to the team and boost earning power. All of those positives can translate into an increased commitment to your organization.

    What are you planning for?

    It’s important to differentiate succession planning from other strategic staffing plans, says William J. Rothwell in a Dale Carnegie white paper entitled The Nuts and Bolts of Succession Planning.

    What it’s not is replacement planning, Rothwell says. That’s the process of identifying individuals within an organization, and often in the same division or department, who would be best-equipped to serve as backups for current employees.

    While replacement planning is an important part of an organization’s overall operating strategy, succession planning takes a much broader viewpoint – it encompasses the total operation, rather than individual positions, departments or divisions.

    As Robert E. Lewis and Robert J. Heckman put it in their oft-cited paper, Talent management: A critical review:

    Consider the following question, If you were to begin the process of constructing a building how would you go about it? Would you assemble a group of the best professionals in each necessary craft (plumbing, electrical systems, carpentry, etc.) and let them define your building? Or, would you start with an analysis of the relationship between “construction practices” and some outcome you hope to achieve (building longevity or cost of operation)? Probably not. You probably would first meet with an architect to begin drawing a blueprint after considering a series of key questions such as, what do you hope to accomplish with this building? Will those goals appeal to the intended customers (tenants or shoppers)? What alternatives for orienting the building on its site best accomplish its purpose?

    It is always important to be clear about the end-goal of any strategic planning effort and succession planning is no different.

    The first thing to do is figure out your plan’s target and scope. To be effective, the succession planning process should be:

    Formal. While a succession planning process needs to match an organization’s overall culture, whether buttoned down and hierarchical or more casual and egalitarian, everyone involved needs to understand that this is a well-defined process with support from top leadership and mission-critical outcomes at stake.

    Comprehensive. It’s tempting to think of succession planning as applying only to senior leadership roles, but an effective plan will look at critical positions and people at every level of the organization.

    Strategically Linked. Every aspect of your succession plan needs to support the organization’s overall strategy. That is the guiding star that will help to define the kinds of people and types of training you need to put in place as you build a talent pipeline to the future.

    Linking Succession Planning to Your Strategic Plan

    A paint-by-numbers succession planning effort is doomed to give you an uninspired and amateurish result. Only by matching your succession planning to your organization’s guiding strategy can you confidently identify the positions, skills and employees needed to succeed.

    Whatever your organization’s size and your target, a succession plan should focus on four specific outcomes:

    1. Identify mission-critical positions and any current or impending talent gaps – based on the strategic opportunities you identify and how you create competitive advantage. Which jobs and skills are must-haves? Do those positions already exist or do we need to create them?
    2. Identify employees at every level who have the potential to assume greater responsibility advancing your organization’s strategic goals and how they fit together – what combination of A, B and C performers do we need and how do we attract and keep them?
    3. Encourage meaningful investment in a training and development program for high-potential employees – be ready to defend allocating resources to a given talent pool(s) or to talent in
      general rather than technology, marketing or other investments.
    4. What is the process for revisiting and revising your succession plan as conditions change?

    With those factors in mind, how do you go about building and refining a succession plan? Here’s some help.

    Building a team

    You’ve committed to building a succession plan, now its time to think about who you need on the team who will do the work. You need to decide who will design the plan and also determine who will be responsible for implementing and evolving your plan when it’s in place.

    You’ll want to include people with different skills and from a variety of functions when assembling the succession planning team.

    Of course, in smaller organizations, team members are going to wear multiple hats.

    Some of the needed skills include:

    Organization and process-orientation. While the succession planning effort itself needs to focus on goals, you’ll want someone on the team who will keep things moving along during the plan development phase.

    That person needs to have enough authority to give other members assignments and to get answers from various departments.

    Organizational knowledge. The team needs to include someone with a solid handle on most of the organization’s existing job descriptions and insight into any new positions that might be needed to accomplish the goals you’ve set.

    And at least one member of the team should have connections throughout the organization and know who they can approach to build support for the succession planning effort.

    Effective communication. Like many other strategic initiatives, the information gathering phase of succession planning can create nervousness and give rise to rumors about job changes (often true) or massive job losses (often false).

    Keeping the rest of your organization working productively while this is going on requires skillful communication to share enough information to keep a lid on any panic-button pushers.

    If handled well, giving employees insight into the process can help reassure them that company leaders are preparing the organization for the long haul.

    Identifying strengths and weaknesses

    So, you’ve committed to building a succession plan and picked your team. What’s their next step?

    It’s time to brainstorm. What are all the internal and external factors that your plan needs to account for? Here are some questions to consider:

    • Organizations face increasingly rapid changes in macroeconomic, industry and social trends — which ones can you anticipate and prepare for?
    • Competition can come from anywhere in the world. How will you keep an eye on — and respond to — new challenges?
    • Does your team have all the skills you’ll need? Can training fill the gaps or will you need to hire?
    • Boomers are retiring and the generational mix of your workforce will look very different soon. What do demographic changes mean for your organization?
    • The research is clear: companies with a diverse workforce outperform the competition. How will you leverage succession planning to increase diversity in your line organization and leadership team?
    •  Do you need to change your org structure and talent management processes to match these challenges?

    Build or Buy? Finding the right people

    The first phase of this part of the process is to identify key/critical positions, ideally at every level of the organization.  A position is determined to be key or critical under the following criteria:

    • Organizational structure — The position is a key contributor in achieving the organization’s mission
    • Key task — The position performs a critical task that would stop or hinder vital functions from being performed if it were left vacant
    • Specialized competencies — The position requires a specialized or unique skill set that is difficult to replace
    • Geography — The position is the only one of its kind in a particular location or it would be difficult for a similar position in another location to carry out its functions remotely,
    • Potential high turnover job classes — Positions in danger of “knowledge drain” due to impending retirements or high market demand for the skill set, and
    • Future needs — based on the SWOT analysis that launched the succession management project, positions that need to be created and defined.

    Skillset analysis

    Once critical positions and areas at risk of high turnover are identified, it’s time to look at the specific competencies required to do those jobs effectively.

    The questions you need to ask during the skill set analysis are closely related to the strategic questions your team addressed in the first part of this process:

    • What are the external and internal factors affecting this specific position?
    • How will the position be used in the future?
    • What competencies or skillsets will be required?
    • What is the current bench strength?
    • How will you provide stretch opportunities to high-potential employees?
    • What is the path from where they are to where you need them to be?  and
    • What are the gaps (competencies or skillsets not possessed by current employees)?

    At the end of this analysis you will have the answer to the most important succession planning question: “Can we develop our existing pool of internal candidates quickly enough or must we ramp up our search for strong outside candidates?”

    The good news is you now have a clear idea of what you have and what you are still looking for and can move on to the next steps in the process, which we look at in other reports in our HR Morning talent management series:

    • designing the right training programs for each talent pool based on strategic importance, available resources and growth path
    • refining your recruiting plan to maximize your chances to get the most from your recruiting efforts, to use your time and energy wisely and effectively, and to pursue only the most likely paths to recruiting success and
    • retaining key personnel.

     

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  • IMPROVE EMPLOYEE RETENTION WITH THESE 5 LEADERSHIP ‘SOFT SKILLS’

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Communication, Management, retention, Retention & Turnover, Talent Management

    interview questions

    Employee retention strategies are cropping up everywhere. But even the “best of the best” strategies won’t help if managers don’t have the skills to positively engage their people one-on-one.

    The key to engaging and retaining good people relies on those soft skills that good managers know they need to constantly strive to get better at.

    Here are five leadership skills that are guaranteed to help you retain good employees.

    Soft skill 1: Listening

    We have two ears and one mouth, so we may listen more and talk less. – Epictetus

    Ironically, good communication depends more on a person’s ability to listen than on his or her ability to speak. When leaders listen well, they absorb issues, understand feelings, foresee potential problems and solutions, and eventually communicate the right decisions in the right tone.

    Any leader can hear and parrot back information. Good leaders listen so they can process the information.

    Follow these tips to better listening:

    • Keep yourself clear. When employees, colleagues, clients or customers need their managers, it’s important to give them undivided attention by talking privately at an arranged time with no distractions (e-mail, phones, paperwork).

    Tip: When employees ask their managers, “Do you have a minute?” If they don’t have time they can respond, “I only have a minute right now. If you need more time, I’d be happy to arrange a meeting later today.”

    • Take notes. This serves two purposes: It helps leaders remember what’s been said and keeps track of the most important facts and emotions. Taking notes also shows people you care and are listening whole-heartedly.
    • Hold your tongue. Avoid interrupting speakers, especially in one-on-one conversations. Let others get through the facts and emotions. Often, just spilling their guts is enough to make them feel better – and you’re a hero for listening and not saying a word!
    • Get focused. If managers have an important task to accomplish, they should make a note of it before they start a conversation with someone. That way they can stop thinking about the call to make, e-mail to send, report to finish, etc., and focus on the conversation at hand.
    • Hold judgment. Put aside unrelated personal feelings about people and their circumstances when listening to them. Instead, focus on the facts and acknowledge emotions.
    • Be open to opinions. Leaders sometimes don’t agree with what employees, co-workers, clients and customers say – and stop listening because they’re focusing on their rebuttal. Instead, they should continue to listen and note their points when it’s their turn to talk.
    • Respond, don’t react. Finally, when you’re done listening and ready to talk, focus on giving a response rather than a reaction. What’s the difference?
    • A response is a balance of thought and emotion, and often includes a question so you can better understand.
    • A reaction is mostly an emotional action that lacks thought and understanding of what the other person said.

    Soft skill 2: Communicating

    Communication is about being effective, not always about being proper. – Bo Bennett

    Communicating well is the cornerstone of good relationships. Whether leaders are talking to employees or colleagues, writing e-mails, training or speaking in front of a group, these communication essentials will help:

    • Create a commonality. Once leaders know their colleagues and employees, they can share information about themselves that they have in common (for instance, a hobby, past experience in work or life, an interest in events or sports, etc.). It makes them more approachable.
    • Be courteous. People will listen, and things will get done if managers communicate with courtesy. For example, “Can you please …?” “I need you to do … Will you be able to?” “Please take care of …”
    • Be consistent. Match your tone of voice with your words.
    • Clarify. When the topic is important (not just casual), it’s vital for managers to make sure they’re understood. For example, they could ask “What questions do you have about this report?”
    • Show confidence. Back up statements with facts. Leaders should try to avoid tentative language such as might, maybe, possibly and ASAP.

    Soft skill 3: Nonverbal communication

    When deeds speak, words are nothing. – African Proverb

    In most cases, actions speak louder than words. If a manager says, “I like your work,” and rolls his or her eyes, the words aren’t believable.

    In fact, research has found:

    • The words we choose have a 7% impact on what’s interpreted,
    • Tone of voice has a 38%impact, and
    • Body language has a 55% impact.

    That’s why it’s important for leaders to make sure their body language complements what they say. They can do this by keeping these non-verbal communication cues in check:

    • Eye contact. Looking directly at people when speaking shows respect and sincerity. It builds a better conversation and relationship. On the flip side, leaders who avoid eye contact appear to be sneaky, guilty, bashful or frightened. Caveat: Avoid staring or blinking rapidly. Instead, look away from time to time to appear relaxed and comfortable.

    Tip: If maintaining eye contact is uncomfortable, focus on the bridge of the listener’s nose. This gives the appearance of looking someone in the eye.

    • Body position. Conversing while standing or sitting side-by-side can make people feel disconnected, and when done face-to-face can be uncomfortable. Ideally, it’s best to keep the same eye level and remain at a slight angle from others. In addition, maintaining good posture shows confidence so others will pay attention.
    • Proper distance. Being too close or too far from others during a conversation can make it less productive. Stay within arm’s reach. Also, pay attention to people’s body language. If they seem uncomfortable, give them a little more space.
    • Gestures. Motion can add meaning to or detract from messages.

    Remember:

    • Crossed arms signal anger or lack of openness to ideas.
    • Playing with clothing, jewelry, pencils, etc., distracts listeners.
    • Large gestures also distract the audience.
    • Facial expressions. A person’s face speaks the loudest in non-verbal communication. Forced smiles show insincerity. A wrinkled forehead shows tension. Pursed lips suggest anger. Rolling eyes or head tilts indicate disapproval. Managers need to make sure the facial expressions they use are in line with the message they want to deliver.

    Soft skill 4: Delivering bad news

    Nothing travels faster than light, with the possible exception of bad news, which follows its own rules. – Douglas Adams

    Only one thing can be worse than hearing bad news: delivering it. Nearly every leader has to deliver bad news at one time or another.

    Doing it with finesse will help managers go down in company history as a well-liked professional.

    Here’s how to deliver bad news so it’s a little easier on the people affected by it:

    • Make it fast. Delivering the news as quickly as possible gives people a chance to plan their next move. One caveat: Avoid delivering bad news on a Friday (or whatever is the end of the work week) so the news doesn’t fester with people for days, and they come back to work upset or resentful.
    • Visit or call. Deliver bad news personally. When leaders do this, it shows they care

    about how the news will affect their people. Delivering bad news via e-mail or a memo suggests leaders are distancing themselves from the people and situation.

    • Be as honest as possible. Managers don’t have to reveal every detail (because some

    are personnel- or financial-related). Plus, people don’t have time for all the details. But to maintain credibility, leaders want to avoid covering up mistakes, forgetfulness or miscommunications that led to decisions and bad news.

    • Take responsibility. Leaders don’t want to blame themselves, their bosses or the company if they aren’t to blame. Then again, don’t blame “the economy” for everything, either. Acknowledge your part in the situation without being defensive.
    • Respond. Give employees, co-workers, clients or customers a chance to discuss how the bad news affects them. Acknowledge their feelings, and offer suggestions on how to deal with the situation.

    Soft skill 5: Saying no

    The art of leadership is saying no, not saying yes. It is very easy

    to say yes. – Tony Blair

    You’d think to be a people person, leaders would also have to be a “yes

    man/woman.” Wrong. Leaders have to say no to people and ideas, or they’d never get anything

    done. However, it’s best to give a no answer in a way that doesn’t make the

    person with the request feel rejected.

    Here’s how:

    • Empathize. When leaders and managers can’t do what people want or can’t give employees permission to do something, they need to let them know they understand the situation.
    • Clarify. Leaders should explain why they have to refuse the request.
    • Offer something. It’s best for leaders to end the denial on a positive note by telling people how they’re willing to help.

    Examples:

    “I see you need some help, but your request is outside normal

    procedures. Have you considered … ?”

    “I can tell this is important to you. It’s a unique situation. I can

    help you by … ”

    “I’d like to do that, but it’s beyond what’s possible for us. Please

    let me help you in another way.”

     

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  • NEW RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS KEY TO SUCCESSFUL FEEDBACK AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Employee performance, feedback, Latest News & Views, Management, Performance Management, Performance Managemnt, Retention & Turnover, Talent Management

    Performance management theory and practice is among the fastest-evolving areas of human resources. New research from corporate performance think tanks reflects recent psychological insights into the power – and drawbacks – of how we provide performance feedback to employees.

    Most of us are familiar with the concept of the “flight or fight” response to anything that is perceived as a threat. That response comes from one of the oldest and least evolved structures in the human brain. Unfortunately, although understandably, most humans respond to even well-intentioned criticism much the same way they’d react to a physical threat — they switch from thinking to reacting. And that isn’t a one-way street. Research shows that both giving and receiving feedback are stressful — they feel like conflict and we prepare and react accordingly.

    That has a real impact on how employees — and supervisors — perceive performance management, whether that’s in the form of an annual sit down that ends with numerical rankings or continuous communication models where supervisors are giving regular feedback to workers on a weekly or even daily basis.

    Flipping the feedback loop

    So, is there a solution to this deeply seated, brain-based problem? According to research published by the NeuroLeadership Institute (NLI) , the trick is to flip the feedback loop on its head.

    Instead of structuring performance discussions around GIVING feedback, the researchers recommend training everyone — employees, supervisors, managers and execs —to instead ASK for feedback on a regular basis. That puts the asker in a position of control and reduces the stress reaction. It also means that everyone needs to think about specific aspects of the job they want to discuss.

    NLI’s research indicates that encouraging a common habit of thoughtful and honest communication by changing your feedback model can help form a healthy organizational culture. Other research by the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp) and the Center for Effective Organizations (CEO) supports the idea that organizational and financial results improve when positive and productive goal setting, performance assessments and career development conversations result in better employee motivation, engagement and retention.

    HR pros often struggle to get managers and employees to treat performance management as a positive opportunity for growth rather than an unavoidable, but deeply uncomfortable, ritual. Taking a fresh approach to how you think about feedback might make a real difference.

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