TALENT ACQUISITION

  • NEW DECADE. DIFFERENT RECRUITING SKILLS AND TOOLS REQUIRED

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, HR trends, Recruiting training, talent acquisition

    Over the last five years, we have seen that the top concern of all executives is finding, hiring, and retaining talent. As we approach 2020, company leaders will still lose sleep. Want to put their minds at rest? Here are my top five skills recruiters will need to be successful in the coming decade.

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  • WHO’S IN CHARGE OF HIRING (ANSWER: NO ONE)

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, talent acquisition

    Sourcers are in charge of sourcing. Recruiters are in charge of recruiting. HR business partners are in charge of managing and scoping the business need. Compensation & Benefits is in charge of leveling the offer relative to other organizations. Talent acquisition leadership is in charge of managing the recruiters. Leadership is in charge of resources and strategic decisions. Hiring managers are in charge of selecting who gets the offer.

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  • RECRUITING’S MISSED STRATEGIC OPPORTUNITY — COMPLETIVE INTELLIGENCE GATHERING 

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, talent acquisition

    This “think piece” is designed to stimulate your thinking about activities that recruiting should be doing, but most do not. 

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  • WHAT’S ON THE MINDS OF TALENT-ACQUISITION LEADERS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, Organizational Leadership, talent acquisition

    It’s 7:25 a.m. on a crisp NYC spring morning and I’m sitting at the back table at Ai Fiori at the Langham Hotel in Manhattan waiting for the last of six top NYC talent acquisition leaders to arrive for breakfast. The breakfast isn’t scheduled to start until 7:30 a.m., but already the conversation is flowing and connections are being made. I keep my mouth shut, sit back, and listen intently, like an anxious parent watching their child perform at their first school play. I can’t wait to see what unfolds.

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  • RECRUITING IS A SCIENCE NOT AN ART — HOW INTUITION HURTS RECRUITING RESULTS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, Recruiting training, talent acquisition

    The future of recruiting is scientific, data-driven, and businesslike. The roadblock to that transition is our current “art not science” approach where intuitive recruiters act like artists who want 100 percent freedom over how they work.

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  • ELIMINATE THIS COMMON ISSUE THAT UNDERMINES EFFECTIVE RECRUITING AND HIRING

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, Hiring Process, talent acquisition

    Most leaders agree that implementation and follow-through are required for business success. Organizations that execute their well-thought-out plans succeed, and those that don’t fail. So why don’t people follow through on plans, especially for something as important as recruiting and hiring the right people? The answer may be staring you right in the face.

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  • MY JOURNEY TO A DATA-DRIVEN TALENT-ACQUISITION TEAM

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, Hiring Process, talent acquisition

    I was lucky enough to get the opportunity to build a new talent-acquisition team from scratch. I faced the tough challenge of building metrics that enabled us to make better business decisions and steer our teams toward our strategic goals. I’m going to share our three-year-four-steps journey to metrics (and what we’re planning for analytics) to help others going through a similar process.

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  • RECRUITING’S TOP 7 BOTTOM-LINE BUSINESS IMPACTS THAT MOST IGNORE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: candidate experience, corporate recruiting, Featured, Hiring Process, productivity, talent acquisition

    The ultimate goal of any business function should be to have a direct and measurable impact on their company’s bottom line and corporate strategic goals. Having a direct and visible impact on bottom-line results will make your team proud. But it will also get you more executive support and funding. Even though nearly every recruiting leader strives to “be more strategic,” few talent-acquisition leaders seem to be aware of the specific recruiting areas that generally have the highest impact on bottom-line business results like revenue generation and workforce productivity.

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  • TALENT ACQUISITION: 3 WAYS HR CAN GUIDE THOSE PICKY HIRING MANAGERS IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: hiring, Hiring & Recruiting, In this week's e-newsletter, recruiting, talent acquisition

    Your people make or break your company, but finding the right hire in this tight labor market is a big challenge for HR pros. 

    Something that can make it even more difficult? A meddling manager with unrealistic expectations about their ideal new hire and how the process should go.

    Problematic requests

    This is what John Vlastelica, founder of online hiring resource Recruiting Toolbox, addressed at the recent ERE Recruiting Conference in San Diego.

    According to Vlastelica, managers can be HR’s (and their own) worst enemy when it comes to choosing a candidate. Sometimes, they’re overly picky. Other times, they want the hiring process to move too quickly.

    If you start hitting hiring road bumps with your managers, it’s important to take a step back and evaluate the situation, Vlastelica says.

    When your manager makes an unreasonable request, what are they really asking you for?

    Vlastelica highlighted three common misconceptions managers have about the hiring process and how you can adjust their expectations.

    1. The more resumes, the better

    You may encounter a manager who wants you to keep passing along a giant stack of resumes. After all, the more choices, the better – right?

    Wrong, according to Vlastelica. While you don’t want to just select the first decent candidate, too many choices will be overwhelming. No one can properly compare a dozen different applicants.

    Vlastelica suggests giving your managers three to five strong candidates. If you receive pushback from a manager who wants more options, focus on selling the applicants you’ve already selected. You picked them for a reason – explain why to your manager.

    If a manager isn’t pleased with anyone after conducting several interviews, it can indicate problems lurking in the middle of the
    hiring process.

    If that’s the case, Vlastelica says to think about what’s going wrong in the interviews that’s causing your manager to want to start fresh.

    If there’s a disconnect during the interview process, more resumes won’t help fix your hiring problem.

    What might be going wrong in the interview process? Hireology CEO Adam Robinson says not giving candidates enough attention can be employers’ downfall. You may try to get back to your applicants as quickly as possible, but it just takes one or two bad reviews on Glassdoor to discourage quality candidates from applying.

    If you don’t treat candidates as you would clients, you’ll never get the top talent you need.

    2. Cultural fit is highly important.

    When looking at different candidates, it can be tempting to choose whoever will fit into the company culture best, Vlastelica says. But you want to steer your managers away from making the same hire.

    Robinson agrees, and warns against hiring someone just because they “seem like the right fit.” It’s crucial to have tangible criteria to determine whether a candidate would be a good hire. Think about what skills and traits lead to success in the role you need filled, and how you’d test for them.

    Another reason to ignore “good fit” hires? Not enough diversity. Too often, diversity is seen as something simply “nice to have” instead of a necessity. But, hiring people with different backgrounds and skill sets can add a lot to the company’s culture and success.

    When a manager wants you to find a hire who’s a carbon copy of other employees, Vlastelica suggests you remind them that a different hire will add something unique and push thinking in a new direction.

    3. A large panel of interviewers is best.

    If you have a manager who is indecisive or lacks confidence, they may try and compensate by including a lot of people in the interview process to ensure the best candidate
    is chosen.

    While other opinions can help, Vlastelica says too many interviewers will back you into a corner. If your company requires a consensus to make a hire, you’re setting yourself up for failure by including a ton of people in the decision.

    Not to mention, taking everyone’s schedules into account while setting up an interview can be a nightmare.

    Vlastelica suggests thinking about the importance of the hiring decision when deciding how many interviewers to include in the process.

    An entry-level position? One or two people works. A potential C-suite member? You’ll want to include four or five people in the decision.

     

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  • RECRUITING’S ROLE IN FUTURIZING YOUR FIRM’S SKILL SETS MUST BEGIN TODAY

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: corporate recruiting, Featured, future of HR, Recruiting training, Strategic Planning, talent acquisition, technology, Workforce Planning

    Note: This “think piece” is designed to stimulate your thinking about the strategic role of recruiting

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