TALENT SHORTAGE

  • WHY YOUR FIRM HAS A TALENT SHORTAGE EXPLAINED (BLUNTLY)

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Active Candidates, Advertising & Marketing, branding, Employee Referrals, Featured, Passive Candidates, Stay Interviews, Strategic Sourcing, talent shortage

     Most organizations that are facing a talent shortage blame a variety of external factors, even though the actual culprit is the way their firm recruits. Even without visiting your firm, I can guarantee that your recruiting process contains several of the following egregious “talent killing” flaws.

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  • THE WAR FOR TALENT IS NOW A SUPPLY CHAIN PROBLEM

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, HR Insights, Strategic HR, talent acquisition, talent shortage

    When Cognizant, the global IT services company, realized it couldn’t hire data scientists fast enough to keep up with its needs, it started training its own. Now its program turns out data scientists in 90 days.

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  • HIRING IN TODAY’S LABOR MARKET: 4 CANDIDATE ‘RED FLAGS’ YOU MAY WANT TO OVERLOOK

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: candidates, hiring, Hiring & Recruiting, In this week's e-newsletter, interviews, Labor Market, Latest News & Views, recruiting, resumes, talent pool, talent shortage

    When the job market was at its worst, recruiters could afford to be more selective with candidates they chose to interview. But, in this tight labor market, recruiters need to find ways to widen their hiring pools. 

    One way to do this? Try looking at candidates who, in the past, may have been eliminated in the early stages of the hiring process, due to reasons that aren’t exactly relevant anymore.

    Evil HR Lady Suzanne Lucas explains which resume “red flags” shouldn’t immediately disqualify a candidate, since after an interview, you might discover they would be a good fit.

    1. Laid off from last job

    Lay-offs are not at all representative of an employee’s ability or work ethic. Over 300,000 workers experienced lay-offs during the 2008-2009 recession; odds are, many of them were good employees who were just in the wrong job at the wrong time.

    Often, a lay-off is just an indicator of financial instability at a candidate’s previous company. To get to the reason behind the lay-off, ask a candidate if they could explain a little bit about their previous company’s situation during this time.

    2. Big gaps in work history

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are 1.4 million Americans who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or longer.

    But just because candidates have been out of the workforce for a while, doesn’t mean they’d be a bad hire. There could be many reasons why it’s been a while since their last job — but you won’t know unless you ask them about it.

    To get a better idea of what they could bring to the table, ask these candidates what their short-term and long-term career goals are.

    3. No bachelor’s degree

    In today’s job market, a bachelor’s degree seems like a requirement for practically every job. But ask yourself: Is that degree really necessary for this job? Or could years of work experience make up for the lack of college education?

    When speaking to these candidates, find out more about relevant skills they’ve learned over the years. See if they have further education plans in the future, too.

    4. Record of job-hopping

    At first glance, switching jobs a lot seems like a deal-breaker. Why should you hire someone if they most likely won’t stick around? And maybe they do get bored easily, but there might be an explanation for all the job-hopping.

    The candidate might’ve joined a start-up that went under in six months. Maybe their spouse got a job across the country so they moved, or maybe they had the worst manager in the world.

    None of these reasons have anything to do with the candidate being disloyal or wishy-washy, but you won’t know unless you ask.

     

     

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  • HOW TO USE RELOCATION TO WIN THE WAR FOR TALENT

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, Labor Market, relocation, Strategic HR, talent acquisition, talent shortage

    In the past couple of years, we’ve been able to count on at least one piece of good news each month: steadily dropping unemployment rates.

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  • HIRING WISDOM: IT PAYS TO HIRE EX-CONS

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, HR trends, Legal, Compliance & Policies, recruiting, talent acquisition, talent shortage

    Yet another sign of the robust demand for workers is that more US employers are hiring applicants with criminal records.

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  • HOW A CRM CAN HELP YOU HIRE FASTER AND BETTER

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Candidate Control & Management, Candidate Engagement, candidate experience, corporate recruiting, Featured, talent acquisition, talent shortage

    CRM recruiting concept

    Today’s labor market has become candidate-driven. With multiple job opportunities to choose from and easy access to information about companies and their employment brand, candidates act more and more like consumers.

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  • 7 WAYS WE CREATED THE CURRENT TALENT SHORTAGE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: Featured, talent shortage

    Yale Law School

    Just about every consulting firm, CEO, hiring manager, and recruiter believes there is a significant shortage of qualified people for existing and emerging jobs. This belief is especially true for positions requiring engineering, science, computing, and math skills. Many educational institutions are refocusing efforts to produce more STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) graduates, and parents are urging their children to study those subjects. There are daily television programs and frequent articles on our lack of STEM education in high schools and universities.

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  • ATTRACTING GREAT APPLICANTS WHEN QUALIFIED PEOPLE ARE SCARCE

    AUTHOR: // CATEGORY: challenger gray & christmas, digital recruiting, Hiring & Recruiting, labor shortage, Special Report, survey, talent shortage

    talent shortage

    More than three in four employers say they’re struggling to find qualified people to fill their open positions.  

    Outplacement consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas recently conducted a survey of 100 human resources executives in a variety of industries nationwide. The bottom line: 77% of respondents said they were having trouble filling open slots because the applicants they were seeing didn’t have the right backgrounds.

    The toughest slots to fill? Here’s a rundown:

    • Technology/technical — cited by 45% of respondents
    • Finance — 30%
    • Manufacturing — 20%, and
    • Management — 5%.

    About half of survey participants said their companies are not yet offering any special incentives to attract candidates. Other firms are using referral bonuses (36%), relocation assistance (36%) and signing bonuses (23%).

    Finally, the most chilling finding in the research: 91% of respondents said that as the economy continues to expand, the labor shortages will become even more acute.

    The old recruiting channels just aren’t working

    Clearly, in an era when good people are difficult to find, it’s important to take steps to draw the best talent into your candidate pool.

    Jerome Ternyck, writing on Inc.com, says many companies unwitting cripple their recruiting efforts by using outdated and unsophisticated tools: spreadsheets, email and applicant tracking systems (ATS).

    Here’s Ternyck’s three-step prescription for modernizing your digital recruiting efforts:

    1. Sourcing: Do you have a wide choice of candidates?

    Candidates are not just searching job boards and your company’s careers page anymore. They’re also visiting your company’s social media pages, interacting in your social networks, your colleagues’ social networks, recruiters’ networks–and they’re wanting to engage over the web and mobile. You need to have a presence whenever the talented candidate wants to say, “Hello.”

    2. Engaging: How do you keep great candidates in your pipeline?

    Once you’ve captured great candidates, you have to woo them. We now live in a transparent world. Candidates know as much about your company as you do. Build a strong and attractive employer brand across every touch point, including your company’s culture page, social media pages and blog. Equally important: make it dead simple to apply. It should take one click. Any more complexity than that will have you losing great candidates in no time.

    3. Closing: You have two weeks to close top talent

    That’s it. If you’re recruiting process takes longer than that, you’ll lose the best candidates. In the first week, you should do pre-screenings and initial interviews. The next week is for the second round of interviews and assessments by the hiring team–and that should comprise four members to be exact. Hiring is a team sport. Each hiring manager asks different questions and digs into topics that another might not. Four viewpoints together provide a more accurate assessment of a candidate.

    By the end of the week, make your offer. Herein lies the crux of the new world of recruiting and hiring: you have to do all of these steps –write a killer job ad, cast a wide net, engage deeply with candidates and collaborate to interview, assess and make a decision–all within two weeks. That’s what it takes to drive your hiring process from good to great.

     

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